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City of Edmonton - LRT Crossing Assessment Framework

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
City of Edmonton - LRT Crossing Assessment Framework
by Macintosh,S; Alampi,N.
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P22 - INTERNET


Impacts to traffic and the ongoing debate around grade separations are some of the most highly debated issues along planned LRT corridors. Edmonton’s 2017 municipal election brought many related issues to the fore, including: increased demands for the technical rationale behind decisions; a need for a more defined toolkit for decision-making regarding intersection performance; and greater clarity around City vision and project trade-offs. As a result, the City of Edmonton’s LRT Delivery group, in conjunction with other key City personnel and a study of industry best practices, developed a process and accompanying evaluation criteria to both clarify its own processes and assist City Council in making these critical decisions. The framework developed consists of a three phased approach that aims to balance sustainable urban integration principles with impacts to network operations. This framework is being used to guide decisions on both new LRT alignments as well as expansions to the existing network and has recently assisted City Council in making critical decisions along the Valley Line West and Metro Line corridors.

Impact of Light Rail Crossings on Vehicle Travel Times

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
Impact of Light Rail Crossings on Vehicle Travel Times
by Gaas,B.
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P20 - INTERNET


Portions of Calgary’s light rail system (the C-Train) operate at grade, parallel to roadways. The public has expressed concern that an upcoming expansion to the rail network will negatively impact vehicle travel times at intersections where the C-Train track and roads intersect. This study was created to quantify the effects of existing C-Train/vehicle conflicts on vehicle travel time. It utilized C-Train arrival and departure times, GPS locations of a pace car, and automated Bluetooth detectors to characterize vehicle travel times through a major intersection during peak volume hours. The combined results suggest that delays caused by conflicts with the C-Train are common, and the resulting delays are similar in duration to the delay caused by regular signal cycles.

Multimodal Traffic Signal Timing Coordination: A Case Study in Vancouver, BC

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
Multimodal Traffic Signal Timing Coordination: A Case Study in Vancouver, BC
by Do,A; Law,PLA; Tengattini,S; Lim,C.
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P18 - INTERNET


This paper summarizes the investigation into coordinating traffic signal times along the Dunsmuir Street corridor in downtown Vancouver (Canada) for the benefit of cyclists. The objective of this paper is to show how to reduce the total waiting time for cyclists by adjusting the optimization speed of traffic lights. Major sources of data include historical traffic volume data provided by the City of Vancouver, manual collection of pedestrian counts and manual collection of bicycle counts. Bike speed data along Dunsmuir Street was recorded using a microcontroller to determine average speeds along various slopes in the corridor and variation amongst users. Space time plots were used to graphically determine signal offsets that would improve bicycle progression along the corridor, based on measured bicycle speed, while mitigating impact on motor vehicles. The sum of all the bandwidth gains and losses from all streets are added to calculate the change in waiting time. Data was also used in modelling the current day transportation impact along Dunsmuir Street to motorized vehicles. The paper shows that coordinating traffic signal for bicycles can be achieved with no significant impact on delay time and level of service to vehicles. The average number of stops a cyclist encounter is reduced, as well as a reduction in the wait time at a red lights.

An Integrated Modelling Approach for LRT Projects - A Case Study of Edmonton's Valley Line LRT

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
An Integrated Modelling Approach for LRT Projects - A Case Study of Edmonton's Valley Line LRT
by Abdelnaby,A; McMillan,S; Christo,A.
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P07 - INTERNET


Various Light Rail Transit (LRT) projects are currently being constructed or planned in several jurisdictions across Canada. With many projects now in the planning stages, agencies are defining how LRT operations are governed, modelled, and evaluated. Different jurisdictions, agencies, and consultants tackle operations differently which can affect the final outputs from a technical perspective. Typically, each LRT line varies in design and operation— from street running with basic Transit Signal Priority to lines with gated operation—requiring modeling unique situations. There are innovations in modelling processes resulting in better outcomes in the planning stage by garnering more confidence in outputs such as the LRT and traffic operational models. The significance of improving outputs reliability, such as LRT run time, traffic Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs) including those for active modes, is that they set the expectation for opening day operations. Depending on the project’s funding and procurement method, the outputs can become part of Project Agreements (PAs) which govern penalties and relief events for operations during the concession period. Jurisdictions, agencies, and practitioners may develop guidelines, tools, and processes to control the quality of traffic forecasts and micro-simulation models. This would help achieve consistency between different models, such as LRT models and traffic models. The Valley Line West is a proposed extension of the Valley Line LRT project currently under construction in Edmonton. The Valley Line West is planned to be a low floor urban integrated LRT concept with many in-street running segments. The planning process involves modelling the interactions between the LRT, vehicular traffic and pedestrians to achieve a balanced approach between all modes. An extensive modelling exercise is currently underway and involves the integration of the following models: Edmonton Region Travel Model (RTM) – An EMME based macroscopic model for travel demand forecasting; City of Edmonton Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) Model – A Dynameq based mesoscopic sub area model for network-wide traffic diversion impact analysis; Valley West LRT VISSIM Model – A microsimulation traffic model for detailed operational analysis; OpenTrack Model – An LRT operational modelling tool. The modelling team has developed an integrated and iterative approach whereby the various models feed into each other. This paper highlights and details of modelling approach undertaken towards meeting the goals of the project. This paper focuses on processes rather than the results. This will include an innovative in-house developed program that integrates VISSIM and OpenTrack to achieve better results for both traffic and LRT modelling.

Modelling Network Resiliency to Prepare for Climate Change

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
Modelling Network Resiliency to Prepare for Climate Change
by Wolff,R; Papaioannou,E.
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P05 - INTERNET


Climate change has the potential to transcend our way of life, and a key element of that is how we get around. Increasingly severe weather events such as snowstorms, hurricanes, or flash floods, or slower processes such as rising water levels, may leave our highways underwater, our transportation hubs isolated, and our rail lines blocked. Under these conditions, the ability of the overall transportation network to continue to allow emergency responders to act and people to evacuate will be placed under a severe strain. At this point, a transportation network unable to cope with the conditions may result in mobility chaos at best and disaster at worst, making it critical to incorporate resilience testing into future network planning. The Greater Golden Horseshoe Transportation Plan, currently under development by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO), will test network and service elements in the region under pressure to ensure proofing of transportation infrastructure in Southern Ontario against future conditions. One way in which this could be tested is by assessing the resilience of the existing network to major and recurring events using long range modelling and macroscopic forecasting tools. Using such tools we can stress-test the busiest and most critical network elements and mimic the impact of inclement weather events, or emergency situations, such as the closure of a major rail terminal or highway corridor, or the blockage of interchanges along the busiest freeways, and evaluate for each scenario how resilient the overall network is in reacting to and accommodating demand. A different application of a similar approach could be considered when planning for future road and rail infrastructure in an attempt to act pre-emptively and offset the impact of climate change. Certain locations, such as floodplains, areas susceptible to blowing snow, and urban heat islands, inherently place more stress on infrastructure, and pose higher risks to people and goods travelling through them. Using macroscopic forecasting models and GIS tools we can identify the demand that a potential corridor would generate and compare the extent of infrastructure or the demand in terms of people, vehicles, and value of goods that would use the risk-prone corridors. This approach could help us identify “safer” routes, corridors and infrastructure elements in order to build resilient transportation networks.

Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 20:34
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium
2018.
Edmonton 2018 - CITE Annual Meeting and Conference - Technical Compendium.
CA6 ALV___ 2018P01-61 - INTERNET

Lignes directrices pour l’utilisation des panneaux d’affichage de la vitesse

Mon, 11/05/2018 - 18:56
Lignes directrices pour l’utilisation des panneaux d’affichage de la vitesse
by Ermatinger,V; Guglielmino,M; Kellner,S; Kozak,DA; Lovicsek,M; Otten-Andrew,M.
2017.
CA6 ARH_65 2017A63Z - MAIN


Les panneaux d’affichage dynamique de la vitesse sont utilisés dans plusieurs provinces et territoires du Canada. Ils permettent aux conducteurs de voir leur vitesse, habituellement affichée à côté du panneau indiquant la limite de vitesse permise. Ces dispositifs sont destinés à faire prendre conscience aux conducteurs des limites de vitesse en affichant en temps réel la vitesse à laquelle ils conduisent leur véhicule. On a pu constater qu’ils sont efficaces peu de temps après leur installation. Les Lignes directrices pour l’utilisation des panneaux d’affichage de la vitesse ont été mises au point afin de définir les meilleures pratiques et de fournir des recommandations pour la conception et l’utilisation de panneaux d’affichage de la vitesse dans le contexte canadien pour diverses situations. Ces Lignes directrices permettent et favorisent l’uniformité dans l’utilisation des dispositifs dans tout le Canada; elles ont été rédigées dans le but de servir de document de référence détaillé complémentaire à utiliser conjointement avec le Manuel canadien de la signalisation routière (MCSR).

Guide de conception, de construction, d’entretien et d’inspection des murs de soutènement de sol stabilisé mécaniquement

Mon, 11/05/2018 - 18:41
Guide de conception, de construction, d’entretien et d’inspection des murs de soutènement de sol stabilisé mécaniquement
by Van Dyk,A; Bathurst,RJ; Maher,M; Boone,S.
2017.
CA6 ARH_63 2017D21Z - MAIN


Les murs de soutènement de sol stabilisé mécaniquement (MSSM) sont depuis longtemps utilisés comme murs de soutènement, mais il n’est pas toujours évident de déterminer qui est l’ultime responsable de la conception, de l’assurance de la qualité, de la gestion des actifs et de la réparation des murs, ainsi que de la surveillance en service des murs déjà construits, en particulier en cas de problèmes importants relativement à la construction ou la tenue en service. Le présent guide offre aux maîtres d’ouvrages, ingénieurs, fournisseurs et entrepreneurs des MSSM des lignes directrices pratiques en matière de sélection, de conception, de construction et d’inspection de ces ouvrages, surtout dans le cadre de projets de travaux publics. Le guide a été élaboré sur la base de l’examen de la littérature existante, complétée par de l’information transmise par divers intervenants dans ce domaine. Il ne cherche pas à reproduire les très nombreuses lignes directrices de conception déjà publiées, ni l’information connexe. Il vise plutôt à mettre en évidence les diverses facettes de l’état actuel de la pratique au Canada et à proposer des modifications à la pratique actuelle afin de corriger certaines lacunes.

Manual for Bridge Evaluation

Sun, 11/04/2018 - 20:40
Manual for Bridge Evaluation
Highway Committee on Bridges and Structures.
3rd Edition.
2018.
US6 ABK___ 2018B62 - MAIN


This manual has been developed to assist bridge owners by establishing inspection procedures and evaluation practices that meet the National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS). The manual has been divided into eight sections, with each section representing a distinct phase of an overall bridge inspection and evaluation program. This edition updates Sections 3: Bridge Management Systems; 4: Inspection; 6: Load Rating; and 7: Fatigue Evaluation of Steel Bridges.

Revêtements modulaires en pierre naturelle

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 21:32
Revêtements modulaires en pierre naturelle
2018.
Recommandations C.R.R. ; 95.
BE6 ACE_15 2018R95 - MAIN


Le Code de bonne pratique pour les revêtements modulaires en pierre naturelle constitue un ouvrage de référence pour la sélection des matériaux (tant des éléments en pierre naturelle, que des matériaux de jointoiement et de couche de pose), la conception et le dimensionnement de projets, la mise en oeuvre et l’entretien des voiries en pierre naturelle. La fabrication d’un élément en pierre naturelle trouvant tout d’abord son origine dans des processus qui datent parfois de plusieurs centaines de millions d’années, une introduction du document consacrée à la géologie trouve tout son sens, d’autant plus que l’aspect et les caractéristiques de la pierre y sont fortement liés. Ce document tient compte de l’évolution des techniques de pose et de mise en oeuvre que l’on a pu observer ces dernières décennies suite à la mise sur le marché de matériaux moins traditionnels. Le code de bonne pratique se veut un document technique de base pour toute personne impliquée dans un projet d’aménagement en pierre naturelle. Il s’adresse aux concepteurs, architectes, entrepreneurs, gestionnaires publics ou privés, ou fournisseurs de matériaux.

Synthèse des connaissances et pratiques à propos des chantiers de nuit

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 19:36
Synthèse des connaissances et pratiques à propos des chantiers de nuit
2018.
Synthèse C.R.R. ; 49.
BE6 ACE__5 2018P49 - MAIN


Le présent document tente de rencontrer deux objectifs principaux. D’une part, établir une synthèse des connaissances et pratiques à propos des chantiers de nuit en Belgique et à l’étranger et, d’autre part, analyser les avantages et inconvénients du travail de nuit au regard de divers paramètres tels que le trafic (congestion, sécurité) et les travaux (qualité, productivité, conduite des travaux), ainsi que les paramètres sociaux (santé des travailleurs, état des conducteurs), économiques (coût des travaux, coûts indirects aux usagers, etc.) et environnementaux (pollution lumineuse, bruit, etc.). Sur base des références analysées et de l’information reçue, les principaux éléments décisionnels qui orientent le choix du mode d’exploitation d’un chantier routier, y compris le recours au travail de nuit, sont la minimisation des facteurs de gêne (fluidité du trafic) et le maintien d’un niveau acceptable de sécurité sur le tronçon considéré. En particulier, du point de vue de la limitation de l’impact sur le trafic, il s’agit de planifier des travaux de sorte à réduire l’ampleur et la durée de la gêne occasionnée (sans oublier de tenir compte de l’éventuel report de trafic, organisé ou pas, sur d’autres routes). Concrètement, il s’agira, sur base du trafic existant et en fonction de la période à laquelle se déroule le chantier, de conserver un nombre suffisant de voies de circulation afin de maintenir un niveau de service acceptable. Pour ce faire, on recourt souvent à une classification des sections du réseau routier selon leur sensibilité aux restrictions temporaires et partielles de la circulation. Dans ce contexte, le recours au travail de nuit ou en dehors des heures habituelles de travail apparaît comme une option qui s’envisage dès lors que d’autres mesures s’avèrent insuffisantes ou impossibles à mettre en oeuvre: utilisation de la bande d’arrêt d’urgence, réduction temporaire de la largeur des voies, mise en place d’une déviation, exécution des travaux en journée mais en dehors des heures de pointe, le tout selon le type de travaux considéré. Les critiques à propos des chantiers de nuit et leurs nombreux inconvénients sont fréquentes. Cependant, lorsqu’on examine attentivement l’ensemble des facteurs, la différence entre la construction de jour et de nuit n’est pas significative, ni en termes de coût, ni en termes de productivité, de qualité ou de sécurité. Bien entendu, un bon éclairage et un meilleur contrôle de la circulation sont nécessaires, mais surtout, une bonne planification peut atténuer ou limiter l’impact de tous les facteurs moins avantageux de la construction nocturne. De nombreuses stratégies visant à atténuer les risques doivent être considérées au moment de la prise de décision de réaliser les travaux de nuit, de sorte que le processus d’analyse des risques doit commencer dès les premières étapes du développement du projet.

Winter Roads and Climate Adaptation: Prospective Solutions Through R&D

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 17:34
Winter Roads and Climate Adaptation: Prospective Solutions Through R&D
by Barrette,PD; Charlebois,L.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5164 - INTERNET


In Canada, the total length of the winter road network is estimated at 10,000 km. These are roads that are usable only in the winter. Nature controls the state of a winter road’s foundation – natural ground and ice surfaces – which needs to be trafficable and able to support the vehicles’ weight. These surfaces are particularly sensitive to climate change. A large number of adaptation measures were developed over the years, which can be applied at the planning, construction and maintenance stages, and for traffic management. We have reached a stage where increasing our fundamental knowledge base is required. This can be done through research and development (R&D). Avenues of investigation include a field tool to characterize winter roads in a more systematic fashion, by combining physical information (e.g. road grades, cross-slopes, width, over-land vs over-water ratio) with all operational and logistical data (e.g. opening and closure dates, nature of goods transported) into an interactive database. This could be used for capacity and multimodal planning, as well as to guide priorities on road realignment and incremental replacement (partial or complete) by all-weather road segments. Several outstanding questions regarding the bearing capacity and deformational behavior of floating ice roads could also be addressed. Topics that need to be investigated include: ice cover strength, how long a vehicle can be parked on the ice, how cracking patterns affect ice integrity, and the investigation of known procedures, techniques and technologies to reinforce an ice cover.

Vision Zero - London Road Safety Strategy

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 17:34
Vision Zero - London Road Safety Strategy
by Elmadhoon,M.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5163 - INTERNET


In the City of London, the total number of collisions has declined between 2008 and 2011, from nearly 8,400 to less than 7,500. However, the number of injury collisions increased from approximately 1,400 to over 1,500 in the same period. Following a worldwide trend of agencies focusing efforts on reducing the number and severity of motor vehicle collisions, in 2014 the City of London (the City) developed a Road Safety Strategy to reduce fatal and injury collisions. In 2017, the City adopted the Vision Zero principles, based on which no loss of life is acceptable, making London one of the early Canadian adopters of Vision Zero. One of the key elements of the London Road Safety Strategy (LRSS) during the development of the plan, which occurred between 2012 and 2014, was the coalition building effort, which brought together a multidisciplinary team, including engineering, enforcement, public health, and advocacy groups, among others. This multidisciplinary team expanded the previously active London Middlesex Road Safety Committee into a Steering Committee formed by the City of London, Middlesex County, Ministry of Transportation Ontario, London Police Service, Ontario Provincial Police, Canadian Automobile Association, Young Drivers of Canada, London Block Parent Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Middlesex-London Health Unit.

Solutions for Highway Operators Accounting for Cyclists and Pedestrians: a Manitoba Approach

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 20:12
Solutions for Highway Operators Accounting for Cyclists and Pedestrians: a Manitoba Approach
by Manning,J; Vido,E; Duncan,D.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5155 - INTERNET


Manitobans are cycling and walking on provincial highways, and this is not always safe. While active transportation (AT) on highways presents multifaceted safety concerns, it is legal to walk or cycle on all provincial highways in Manitoba. Highway rights-of-way may be the only available public corridors that connect people to where they want to go. Highways are not conventionally designed for AT purposes. Nevertheless, highway operators have a role to play in ensuring the safety of all highway users and enhancing the wellbeing of citizens. It is with this lens that Manitoba Infrastructure developed the AT Policy and Planning Guide to respond to the following questions: How can a highway operator cost-effectively account for AT safety? Under what circumstances should a highway operator consider AT? What are appropriate AT investments for a highway operator? The outcome of the policy and planning guide development process was to outline the role of Manitoba Infrastructure in addressing AT on provincial highways, and to guide Manitoba Infrastructure’s decision-making process when considering AT users and AT needs, in relation to the provincial highway network. The following summarizes the policy: Local governments and/or trail organizations are primarily responsible for the ownership and maintenance of local AT facilities, which includes design, construction, operation, maintenance, funding, liability, and stewardship. MI maintains on-highway AT-related facilities, in order to protect highway safety and operations. Public transportation, including AT, is an appropriate use of provincial highway rights-of-way, if facilities are appropriately located. MI will work with local governments and trail developers to ensure that AT facilities are well planned and designed to protect highway safety and operations. Where there is significant demand for AT on provincial highways, as interregional and/or interprovincial corridors and connections, MI has a responsibility to: reasonably improve safety and usability partner with local governments and/or trail organizations to facilitate development of AT facilities The resulting planning guide presents a three step approach to considering AT, where Manitoba Infrastructure: 1) reviews if there is AT activity at a location, based on an AT trigger map; 2) prioritizes AT activity, given current and latent demands; and 3) determines the appropriate investment. As a further component of the AT Policy and Planning Guide, Manitoba Infrastructure is publishing maps to inform the public about the AT safety implications of various provincial highways.

Slide-in Bridge Construction using the Construction Manager General Contractor, Contract Delivery Model

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 19:45
Slide-in Bridge Construction using the Construction Manager General Contractor, Contract Delivery Model
by Reid,S; McLeod,C; McInnes,S.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5154 - INTERNET


In 2017, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (ministry) successfully completed the replacement of the Highway 3 Grand River Bridge at Cayuga, Ontario. The existing bridge constructed in 1924 was a five span, 188m long, steel through truss bridge. This complex project included a number of “firsts” for the ministry. This was the first project in Ontario that was delivered using the Construction Manager General Contractor (CMGC) contract delivery model. The project also included a number of innovative solutions, such as slide-in bridge construction of a 188m five span structure, through collaboration with the contractor during the design phase. The CMGC model is still a relatively new contract delivery model for the ministry. The intent of CMGC is to form a collaborative team, between the owner, designer and a contractor, which begins in the design phase and continues throughout construction. During the design phase the contractor provides construction expertise and constructability input into the design with the intent to become the general contractor. This paper provides an overview of the CMGC delivery model, and discusses the rationale for selecting the CMGC contract delivery model for the bridge replacement project in Cayuga. The paper also describes technical solutions developed and implemented by the collaborative CMGC team during both the design and construction phases of the project. Some of the design challenges of the project included the need to construct the replacement bridge while maintaining two-way traffic on the existing bridge; geotechnical challenges related to fractured voided bedrock; the need to maintain existing utility lines across the bridge during the bridge demolition and bridge slide operations; and the need to minimize impacts to the bed and banks of the river. Furthermore, adding to the complexity of the project, during construction, work was stopped for a period of 17 months while the new bridge was sitting on temporary supports and the existing bridge had already been demolished. The CMGC approach again played an important role, enabling the ministry to effectively manage this unforeseen delay through the collaborative relationship developed with the ministry, designer and contractor. Following the successes achieved on this complex project, the ministry has extended the use of the CMGC delivery model to a number of other complex projects.

Sicamous Roundabout – Taming the Octopus!

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 18:50
Sicamous Roundabout – Taming the Octopus!
by Newcombe,E; Pellam,A.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5153 - INTERNET


Dubbed locally as “the Octopus”, the Highway 97A / Main Street intersection forms the entrance to Sicamous, British Columbia, a tourism community with a high percentage of elderly residents, and numerous houseboat rental businesses. The original multi-leg, 45-degree skewed intersection configuration was so confusing and geometrically insufficient that local users avoided the intersection. There were no facilities for cyclists or pedestrians, resulting in significant safety concerns with students from the adjacent school crossing irregularly. The retail businesses immediately adjacent to the intersection suffered as a result. The BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI) had identified a 2-lane roundabout as a preferred option for this location but had previously received adverse comment from the trucking industry (BCTA) regarding roundabouts on numbered routes, primarily due to their perceived inability to accommodate oversized loads. The design of this roundabout therefore needed to carefully balance the safety and operational needs of all users, including oversize permit vehicles, houseboat trailers, and vulnerable users, and required acceptance from the trucking industry and public. Extensive stakeholder and community engagement, as well as innovative design elements, produced a solution with custom aprons for specific vehicle use to better separate users; standardization of materials, colour and textures to identify intended use; a roll-over median approach island to allow counterflow operation of permit vehicles with pilot cars; and reduced cross fall on circular roadway to reduce heavy vehicle racking and roll-over potential. The design is phased for a double-lane facility ultimately. However, a single-lane was constructed initially to gain familiarity and acceptance and improve safety. Active transportation needs are accommodated by multi-use pathways, cycle paths and ramps, and tactile mats are provided for the visually impaired, making it safe for all active modes and in particular the local school children. The design also includes raingardens and native, drought-tolerant plantings, as well as unique public art features. An unintended spin-off of the project is that several adjacent properties have already been rejuvenated due to the significantly improved access. This $7.3M project opened in November 2016 and is safely used by heavy and OS/OW permit vehicles. It has been well received by the local council, Splatsin First Nation, BCTA and MoTI. So much so that this project was awarded the 2017 BC MoTI Deputy Minister’s Award of Excellence for Design.

Shared Streets Accessible to All: A Collaborative Research Initiative to Establish Design Parameters in Quebec

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 18:17
Shared Streets Accessible to All: A Collaborative Research Initiative to Establish Design Parameters in Quebec
by Gendron,PE.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5152 - INTERNET


A research project with the goal of identifying universal accessibility parameters for shared streets was developed by the Transportation Branch of the City of Montreal’s Infrastructure, Roads and Transportation Services Department. This project was initiated in the fall of 2016 and completed in the spring of 2017. The adoption of the Pedestrian Charter in 2006 was a decisive moment for the City of Montreal, as the Charter recognized the pedestrians’ primacy in the urban environment. By designating the pedestrian as the core priority, the City of Montreal wanted to position walking as a primary means of movement, in addition to offering Montrealers a safe and convenient pedestrian environment that would lead to the re-appropriation of the public realm by local residents. The Montreal Transportation Plan, approved in 2008, supports this vision and specifies the need to share the road between all user categories. Measures 14 and 15 of the Transportation Plan respectively focus on redefining the place of motorized transportation and on consolidating the pedestrian environment at the neighbourhood level. In keeping with the Plan’s policy direction, the City of Montreal is developing highly innovative pedestrian infrastructures, including several pilot projects relating to the shared streets concept. The ultimate goal is to develop sustainable mobility at the neighbourhood level by improving pedestrian safety and comfort, encouraging all Montrealers to walk to nearby destinations as a first choice.

Saskatoon BRT – A Catalyst for City Building

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 18:01
Saskatoon BRT – A Catalyst for City Building
by Schulz,C; Hubbell,J.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5151 - INTERNET


An economic and cultural hub in Saskatchewan, Saskatoon has become one of the most attractive places in Canada to live. In the next 25 to 40 years, Saskatoon’s population is expected to double, from 250,000 to 500,000. Based on comprehensive visioning (Saskatoon Speaks), analysis, and planning (Strategic Plan 2013-2023 and Growth Plan to Half a Million), the City recognizes that accommodating growth using a business-as-usual approach would be problematic if not unsustainable. In order to enhance the quality of life and increase economic activity in Saskatoon, the Growth Plan identifies three interrelated strategies: corridor growth, transit and core bridges. Under the transit strategy, bus rapid transit (BRT) forms the backbone of a multi-modal transportation system supporting the movement of people along major corridors, to key destinations and development nodes. Work related to the planning and design of the BRT is underway. The BRT concept, configuration, and preliminary design offers solutions that meets the needs of the Saskatoon transit market, Growth Plan objectives, scale of the community, and available funding. The implementation of the BRT will improve transit frequency, reliability, and customer experience, serving existing customers better and attracting new riders. BRT is also a catalyst for city building. BRT is the mobility backbone of several land use intensification initiatives including: Corridor Plans for 22nd Street, College Drive, 8th Street, Preston Avenue and three mixed use Transit Villages at established commercial nodes adjacent to the future BRT lines.

Safety Swing Arm to Prevent Collisions with Snow Plows

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 17:46
Safety Swing Arm to Prevent Collisions with Snow Plows
by Poitras,R.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5150 - INTERNET


SNC Lavalin O&M is the company responsible for the operations, maintenance and rehabilitation of 275 kilometres of Trans-Canada Highway in New Brunswick; from the Quebec border to Longs Creek (west of Fredericton), and Route 95 between the United States border and Woodstock, until 2033. During its winter operations, SNC Lavalin O&M utilizes echelon plowing, the practice of staggering snowplows across all lanes of a multi-lane highway. By passing the ridge of snow from the lead snow plow to the following plow, echelon plowing makes it possible to clear accumulation from all lanes at once. It is, however, extremely dangerous for motorists to pass between or around the snowplows while in this formation, due to the possibility of whiteout conditions between the plow trucks. There is also the danger of impact with the back of the right side wing plow as it becomes obscured by snow. The number of collisions between motorists and the snow plow right wings was an issue even after many public awareness campaigns on the risks involved when passing between the plow trucks. After the last collision with injury to the plow operator in March 2013, and in the continuing effort to keep motorists as well as employees safe, SNC Lavalin O&M developed a “Safety Swing Arm”. The Safety Swing Arm consists of a 2.7 meter mechanical arm with high intensity flashing lights, installed on the back of the lead plow truck. When the right side wing plow is deployed, the arm simultaneously extends to create a further visual and break-a-way physical barrier between the motorists and the right wing plow. The Safety Swing Arm has been proven to prevent motorists from hitting the right wing while passing the plow during poor visibility conditions.

Safety Evaluation of Lane Widths in the City of Edmonton

Wed, 10/10/2018 - 17:31
Safety Evaluation of Lane Widths in the City of Edmonton
by Peterniak,R; Milligan,C; Muhammed,A; Niepsuj,J.
2018.
TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2018A5149 - INTERNET


This paper synthesizes the results of a project completed for the City of Edmonton in 2017 to recommend lane width values for the City’s Complete Streets Design and Construction Standards. The project included a literature review to synthesize research on the safety and speed implications of narrowed lane widths in urban areas; a jurisdictional review to document peer practice for lane widths and all-season operation in winter cities; and an in-service evaluation of the safety implications of the City’s existing lane widths. A cross-sectional population-segmented study was conducted on the effect of lane widths on safety on 626 Edmonton road segments using five years of data. Regression models were developed to understand the effect of lane width on the proportion of speeding vehicles, the frequency of all severity segment collisions, and the frequency of fatal/injury segment collisions. The main conclusion was that speed should be a primary factor in setting context-sensitive design guidelines for lane widths. The paper concludes with the lane width values incorporated into the City’s Complete Streets Design and Construction Standards. Opportunities for future research are discussed.

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