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MOVE - A City-Built Data Management Platform for Traffic Volume and Collision Data

Fri, 05/26/2023 - 18:40
MOVE - A City-Built Data Management Platform for Traffic Volume and Collision Data
City of Toronto.
2023.
CA6 ARH350 2023M51 - INTERNET


Beginning in 2018, the City of Toronto’s Transportation Services Division embarked on a project to modernize and replace the ecosystem of software used by City staff to manage, retrieve, and analyze motor vehicle collision and traffic volume data. The legacy systems, CRASH for collision data and FLOW for traffic volume data had been in use by Transportation Services staff since the early 1990s. While they were state of the art tools when first built, they were now in urgent need of replacement. These applications were highly susceptible to data quality issues, had issues with error prone processes, and relied on technologies and systems that were obsolete and no longer supported by the City’s Technology Services Division. These legacy software challenges are familiar to most government agencies and large, mature organizations. Together with the limitations of obsolete technology, the applications fundamentally lacked the features needed to support the data needs of the expanding planning and delivery functions of the City’s multimodal street improvement programs and Vision Zero road safety plan. In particular, the project to replace CRASH and FLOW coincided with and was funded through the launch of the City's first Vision Zero road safety plan. The legacy systems — CRASH and FLOW — are two separate applications. But many of the investigations performed by staff require both volume and collision data to give a complete picture of the conditions at an intersection, or along a stretch of road. In particular common processes like conducting traffic signal warrants require viewing and analyzing both data sets together. MOVE brings the data together in one view. A number of questions can be examined by users using the tool. How many vehicles, cyclists, and pedestrians move through this road? Which direction are they going? How many fatalities have previously happened here? Have any collisions had involved cyclists? Have any collisions involved school children? From this point, staff can drill down to find the data they need by using filters.

Cooperative Truck Platooning on Canadian Public Roads in Winter Driving Conditions

Thu, 05/25/2023 - 19:43
Cooperative Truck Platooning on Canadian Public Roads in Winter Driving Conditions
University of Alberta.
2023.
CA6 ARH350 2023C57 - INTERNET


Cooperative Truck Platooning System (CTPS) is a connected and automated vehicle (CAV) technology that allows close-proximity following in platoon formation through longitudinal vehicle dynamic control of connected trucks while using the automated steering control for vehicle lateral dynamic control. CTPS operation under winter driving conditions is challenging as they may cause sensor failure or malfunction as well as safety considerations such as driving distances and visibility. Therefore, the success of using CTPS in commercial trucks for freight transport under real-world driving conditions needs to be assessed. This project implemented and assessed the first CTPS demonstration on Canadian public roads using two class-8 trucks. The University of Alberta and Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) led the trials, data analytics, and assessment. The other partners of the project included Pronto AI, Alberta Transport, Bison Transport, Tantus, and SOLARIS. The project was sponsored by Transport Canada. A total of 41 trips on Highway 2 in Alberta were conducted in January 2022 that covered the typical Canadian winter season. The test matrix included a fixed number of controlled variables (CVs) shown in blue labels in Figure 1. The main CVs were drivers, and the truck operating mode (manual vs using ADAS), platooning distance (measured as the time gap between two trucks) and route. Non-controllable variables (NCVs) are shown in red labels in Figure 1 and were collected during the trials. They were used in the post-processing and analysis of the collected data. These include vehicle engine parameters, road conditions, weather conditions, traffic conditions, cargo weight and trailer configuration.

Automated Avalanche Detection System on Highway 37A

Thu, 05/25/2023 - 19:13
Automated Avalanche Detection System on Highway 37A
British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.
2023.
CA6 ARH350 2023A71 - INTERNET


The BC Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure is always looking to improve avalanche forecasting and control. In 2017, the ministry began investigating technology that could deliver real-time monitoring and alert notifications for natural avalanche activity, 24/7, in all weather conditions. Reliable, timely data of this nature could improve avalanche forecasting, shorten event response time, and help reduce closures while enhancing overall highway safety. Fortunately, funding from the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Program was available to launch the Automated Avalanche Detection System (AADS). The system consists of two avalanche radar stations at two critical locations, Little Bears and George Copper, and a radio link station at Mt Johnson. Radar is a very robust detection technology and works reliably in all visibility conditions (e.g. fog, snowfall, rain, day/night). The AADS radar system permanently scans large slopes at a distance of up to 5 km and automatically detects moving snow masses in real-time.

Traffic Data Collectors in Arctic and Remote Conditions

Thu, 05/25/2023 - 18:34
Traffic Data Collectors in Arctic and Remote Conditions
Government of the Northwest Territories Department of Infrastructure.
2023.
CA6 ARH345 2023T62 - INTERNET


In 2020 the Government of Northwest Territories (GNWT) deployed a traffic data collection system which spanned our entire road network, including artic locations. The solution provider for the project was Stinson ITS, and they were great to collaborate with. These sensor systems were connected to the internet via both LTE cellular and satellite communications, in order to continuously collect data as well as monitor the heath of the devices. In the cloud-based web interface we can access our data via a range of built-in reporting tools as well as download it in raw format. This project was an exciting one for us, our previous data collection system had experienced extensive reliability and maintenance issues. It was a loop based system and was not connected to the internet. Our climate, which often reaches -50C in winter, did not work well with the loops and when these systems failed we wouldn’t know because there was no connectivity. This resulted in very large gaps in our data which interfered with our planning processes. As such we were very excited to deploy a modern and reliable system.

City of North Vancouver Mobility Strategy

Thu, 05/25/2023 - 18:09
City of North Vancouver Mobility Strategy
City of North Vancouver.
2023.
CA6 ARH345 2023C35 - INTERNET


In the spring of 2022, the City of North Vancouver Council approved the City’s long-range transportation plan, the Mobility Strategy. In early 2023, Council confirmed key priorities from the Mobility Strategy for near-term focus, including developing a curbside management framework and speed limit reduction work. This foundational policy document acts as a playbook, enabling our team to deliver on the vision of the Mobility Strategy in step with our community’s changing needs.

Eveline Street Reconstruction Project

Wed, 05/24/2023 - 19:05
Eveline Street Reconstruction Project
City of Selkirk.
2023.
CA6 ARH345 2023E87 - INTERNET


The Eveline Street Reconstruction Project embodies the continuation of revitalizing Selkirk's downtown core and exemplifies a model for other small municipalities who wish to modernize their infrastructure. By prioritizing the pillars in our Strategic Plan, we have created a safe, vibrant, sustainable, and accessible streetscape and community hub that can be enjoyed by citizens and tourists alike. This project not only helped to revitalize our downtown area, it serves as an example of how to successfully renew ageing, outdated infrastructure with vision and purpose. During the planning and construction of this project, the city received three proposals for development along the renewed street. The new Manitoba Metis Federation, mixed-use building is set to begin construction in 2023 with the other two mixed-use proposals moving towards the permitting stage. An additional two new apartment block projects just off of Eveline Street have been proposed which would significantly increase the number of residential units available in our downtown. Last year a new retail business opened up near the corner of Manitoba Avenue and Eveline Street. All of these private-sector projects identified the Eveline Street reconstruction as a major incentive for their investments. The economic return on this project is predicted to be significant, but secondary to the environmental, social, and cultural returns we expect to achieve. Additionally, this project encourages citizens and visitors alike to experience all that our city has to offer while creating a vibrant atmosphere. As we move forward into the future, projects like this one will become essential in maintaining strong communities.

Kamloops City-Wide Synchro Model

Wed, 05/24/2023 - 18:32
Kamloops City-Wide Synchro Model
City of Kamloops.
2023.
CA6 ARH345 2023K11 - INTERNET


The City of Kamloops City-Wide Model was developed in Synchro/SimTraffic and SIDRA. Synchro is a microscopic modelling software that uses the Highway Capacity Manual to determine level of service (LOS) and vehicle delays at intersections. SimTraffic is a microscopic simulation software that is frequently paired with Synchro to examine individual vehicle behaviour at specific links and intersections. Finally, SIDRA is a simulation software that is often used to evaluate the intersection performance of roundabouts. Most cities group signalized intersections into zones and model the traffic in these zones using Synchro. This is commonly done to optimize traffic signal timing within each zone. Using this system, municipal Synchro models are often badly fragmented. Model fragments are often outdated based on when the signals in a zone were last optimized or when a study was last completed. When using such a model, infrastructure upgrade decisions and capital planning can easily become disorganized, unsystematic, and misinformed. The aim of the City-Wide Model is to have an accessible tool to assess network/intersection performance and plan infrastructure upgrades systematically and quantitatively. The City-Wide Model includes all of City’s signalized intersections, major stop-controlled intersections (i.e., potential future signalized intersections), and pedestrians signals in a single Synchro/SimTraffic model. Roundabouts were modelled using SIDRA, as it is a more suitable platform for roundabout analysis. Including all of Kamloops in a single model avoids the problems associated with model fragmentation and ensures that engineering decisions are made using accurate and up-to-date data. The City-Wide Model thus provides a snapshot in time of the entire city’s network.

Vision Zero Framework

Wed, 05/24/2023 - 17:58
Vision Zero Framework
City of Burnaby.
2023.
CA6 ARH340 2023V39 - INTERNET


One of the key objectives of the Framework is to demystify Vision Zero, and illustrate to the City how it can grow the program in manageable and achievable steps. In essence, the development of the Framework is the antithesis of a typical planning endeavour from which it has avoided presenting numerical metrics and rigid time-based programming. Instead of outlining a challenging process, it has simplified a complex philosophical approach into a step-wise strategy that can be readily initiated by most jurisdictions who are considering the development of Vision Zero programming. The exercise was made easier by the fact that the long-range strategic BTP had the foresight to integrate Vision Zero principles and actions into the plan, thus creating a strong foundation for Vision Zero to leverage other transportation, climate and development goals and policies. This allows the City to initiate its Vision Zero programming, without undertaking a separate (and often redundant) public process. The Framework recognizes this significance it owes to the BTP and seizes the opportunity to build and facilitate Vision Zero upon the larger framework of the City’s overall transportation strategic plan. The Framework was designed such that the City’s Vision Zero team would feel comfortable advancing in different directions depending upon relationships that would be developed over time with other City units and external organizations and agencies. In this manner, Vision Zero actively pursues its policy directions while taking advantage of planned and unforeseen opportunities. Above all, the Framework remains flexible in terms of welcoming supporters and champions at any phase of the program and if necessary, maintaining a holding pattern until resources and commitment are secured to advance toward Vision Zero.

Still Creek Avenue Cycling Safety Study and Active Transportation Improvements

Wed, 05/24/2023 - 15:25
Still Creek Avenue Cycling Safety Study and Active Transportation Improvements
City of Burnaby.
2023.
CA6 ARH340 2023S71 - INTERNET


The Central Valley Greenway (CVG) is a regional 25-kilometre active transportation corridor in Metro Vancouver, connecting the cities of Vancouver, Burnaby, and New Westminster (see Figure 1). The CVG is part of Metro Vancouver’s Regional Greenway Network and TransLink’s Major Bikeway Network, a proposed 850-kilometre network of safe and comfortable cycling facilities connecting urban centres and major destinations across Metro Vancouver. While the majority of the CVG is comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, there are a few critical gaps and areas with identified safety issues along the corridor. One of the most challenging locations along the CVG is an 850-metre section of Still Creek Avenue through a busy industrial area in the City of Burnaby. In 2014, the City installed a multi-use pathway along the north side of the road to address pedestrian and cyclist concerns. Due to the nature of the adjacent businesses, there are a high density of driveways with the presence of heavy trucks turning across the multi-use pathway, which conflicted with the high volumes and mixing of pedestrians and cyclists. Further concerns from the public were raised regarding the narrow width of the multi-use pathway and on-street parking which limits sightlines. The purpose of this project was to upgrade the active transportation facilities on Still Creek Avenue between Douglas Road to the east and the Burnaby Eco-Centre to the west to improve the safety and experience for pedestrians and cyclists. This project is consistent with the City’s Transportation Plan and Climate Action Framework, which aim to improve accessibility and enhance opportunities to shift to healthy and sustainable modes of transportation, such as walking, rolling and cycling.

High Friction Surface Treatment at Signalized Intersections in British Columbia

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 20:10
High Friction Surface Treatment at Signalized Intersections in British Columbia
2023.
CA6 ARH340 2023H32 - INTERNET


High Friction Surface Treatment (HFST) is a pavement treatment with exceptional skid-resistant properties not typically provided by conventional materials such as asphalt or Portland cement concrete. The treatment aims to reduce crashes by enhancing the skid resistance quality of the pavement at locations with frequent traffic conflicts where vehicles often brake excessively. In addition, HFST benefits locations with horizontal curves and grades that need additional friction to improve sliding resistance. The increased pavement friction reduces tire skidding during speed/direction changes and helps motorists maintain better control in dry and wet driving conditions. Typical crash types targeted by HFST are rear-end and road-departure collisions, usually observed at intersection approaches, off-ramps, and horizontal and vertical curves. According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), HFST is estimated to reduce total crashes by 57 percent and crashes in wet conditions by 83 percent. However, most HFST applications in the United States have been on horizontal curves and not intersections. As a promising initiative to improve safety, the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and infrastructure (the Ministry), in partnership with the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC), initiated the HFST project targeting high-collision locations across the provincial highway network. In 2018 and 2019, HFST was implemented at fifteen (15) signalized intersection approaches and six (6) highway off-ramps throughout Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island. This document focuses only on the HFST implementation at signalized intersections. The remainder of this report describes the HFST initiative, the site selection methodology, installation specifications and requirements, the safety effectiveness evaluation, the project outcomes in terms of HFST performance and the associated safety benefits, and lessons learned that are transferable to other jurisdictions.

Enhancing equity and road safety in Guelph

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 19:55
Enhancing equity and road safety in Guelph
City of Guelph.
2023.
CA6 ARH340 2023E52 - INTERNET


Many Canadian cities are beginning to adopt Sweden’s Vision Zero philosophy to enhance safety on their roads. Vision Zero is founded on the beliefs that no loss of life on our roads is acceptable and the goal of zero serious injuries and fatalities can be achieved by adopting a safe systems approach (SSA). The SSA is typically broken down into 5 categories: safe road users, safe vehicles, safe speeds, safe roads, and post-crash care. Equity is a crucial component of each one of these subcategories. There is a known relationship between the impact of speed on collision outcomes – at higher travel speeds, drivers have less time to react and therefore the likelihood of fatality for vulnerable road users such as cyclists and pedestrians increases with increasing speed. Everyone has a right to get to their destination safely regardless of their mode choice. However historically, road safety interventions targeted at reducing speeds such as traffic calming, automated speed enforcement and speed limit changes have been implemented on an ad hoc basis without reviewing the needs of varying equity-seeking groups within the community.

York University Cycling Connections: Toronto's First Protected Intersection

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 19:22
York University Cycling Connections: Toronto's First Protected Intersection
City of Toronto.
2023.
CA6 ARH335 2023Y57 - INTERNET


The City of Toronto and the Alta Planning + Design Canada (Alta) team designed and built Toronto’s first protected intersection. The project, which included the construction of a kilometre of separated bikeways and multi-use trails, as well as major improvements to two signalized intersections (Murray Ross Parkway at Evelyn Wiggins Drive and at Keele Street), was part of a vision to grow and connect the cycling network between York University, the Finch West Hydro Corridor Trail, and Finch West TTC station. Starting at the conceptual stage in 2018 and reaching substantial completion in 2022, this project represents a significant expansion of cycling and pedestrian infrastructure in the community with innovation in safe, accessible, and sustainable intersection and bikeway design.

Hamilton Complete Streets Design Manual

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 18:50
Hamilton Complete Streets Design Manual
City of Hamilton.
2023.
CA6 ARH335 2023H11 - INTERNET


The Hamilton Complete Streets Design Manual is a document that provides guidance and new design standards on the design, maintenance and operations of our municipal streets. The Manual will enable Hamilton to create streets that are safe, accessible, and easy to use for people of all ages and abilities. Complete streets are designed to accommodate all users, including pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transit users, as well as automobiles and goods movement vehicles. The Hamilton Complete Streets Design Manual provides detailed information on a wide array of topics related to complete street design, including street typologies, cross-section elements, intersection design, and, most importantly - the design process. It also includes information on street lighting, wayfinding, landscaping, and best practices for designing streets in urban, suburban, and rural contexts. The document is written for engineers, planners, architects, and other professionals involved in the design and delivery of streets in Hamilton and the broader community to provide transparency into the process.

E-Scooter Pilot Project

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 18:28
E-Scooter Pilot Project
City of Richmond.
2023.
CA6 ARH335 2023E76 - INTERNET


Electrified micro-mobility is growing in popularity, regardless of whether these devices are legal or not. The benefit of participating in a pilot project is the use of these devices can now be managed through established regulations and enforcement. Through monitoring and evaluation, Richmond’s E-Scooter Pilot Project (the Project) is an opportunity to understand: Safety - for e-scooter device operators and for others sharing the road and pathways with e-scooters; Impacts to the public realm; Potential for travel mode shift, and; Community perceptions. The Project supports a new low carbon mobility option for Richmond residents, employees and visitors, and encourages transit use with a solution for the first and last mile trip. The goal is to provide a safe, convenient and fun personal mobility option that reduces private automobile use, promotes active transportation and transit use, enhances connectivity, and allows multi-modal access to employment, recreation areas and services. With a shared e-scooter system, the devices can be integrated in future mobility hubs to enhance user access. Trip data from the shared devices is used as input for network planning.

Crescent Road N. W. Master Plan

Tue, 05/23/2023 - 17:42
Crescent Road N. W. Master Plan
City of Calgary.
2023.
CA6 ARH335 2023C66 - INTERNET


Over the last two years, The City of Calgary has worked together with ground cubed and Urban Systems Ltd. to develop the Crescent Road Master Plan. The Master Plan will guide permanent active transportation infrastructure improvements of an iconic street in Calgary; balance the improvements against the street’s different roles and needs; strengthen the street’s sense of place; emphasize the connection to the surrounding natural areas (supporting The City’s recently-completed North Hill Local Area Plan vision); and improve road safety.

Pioneering Innovative Rapid Bridge Replacement Technology in Ontario

Thu, 05/18/2023 - 18:48
Pioneering Innovative Rapid Bridge Replacement Technology in Ontario
2023.
CA6 ARH330 2023P33 - INTERNET


The Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) is responsible for the movement of people and goods safely, efficiently, and sustainably across Ontario to improve quality of life and support a globally competitive economy. The Transportation Infrastructure Management Division, inside MTO, is responsible for identifying infrastructure in need of repair or replacement, planning for the future of Ontario’s infrastructure, designing the needed improvements, and building the next generation of transportation infrastructure. MTO is a leader in exploring and developing new, innovative approaches in highway infrastructure management that maximize time and cost savings while reducing impacts to the travelling public. Starting in 2007, MTO began introducing rapid replacement methods on bridges in Ontario and challenging conventional methods that had been used in Canada for decades. Highway bridges need to be replaced from time to time as they reach the end of their service life or as traffic volumes increase beyond the level they can accommodate. Conventional bridge replacement methods can have a tremendous impact on the travelling public and worker safety. Traffic lanes must be closed in order to work on the bridges one section at a time, sometimes over two or three construction seasons. The challenge faced by the MTO Project Team was to undertake this work with minimal disruption to the daily life of roadway users and to minimize worker exposure within the construction zone. To reduce those impacts on users on the Trans-Canada in the Nation’s Capital, in 2007, the MTO Project Team introduced an innovative method of bridge replacement by using Self-Propelled Modular Transporters (SPMTs) to replace, for the first time on a provincial highway in Canada, the Highway 417 Island Park Drive bridges in Ottawa. Rapid bridge replacement (RBR) technology includes the use of SPMTs and “Jack & Slide” methodologies. The use of this innovative method reduces the two to three years of traffic disruptions from conventional bridge replacements to a period anywhere between 15 to 100 hours.

Nancy Pauw Bridge

Thu, 05/18/2023 - 18:29
Nancy Pauw Bridge
Town of Banff.
2023.
CA6 ARH330 2023N16 - INTERNET

Kingston Third Crossing (Waaban Crossing)

Thu, 05/18/2023 - 18:10
Kingston Third Crossing (Waaban Crossing)
City of Kingston.
2023.
CA6 ARH330 2023K37 - INTERNET


The Kingston Third Crossing project includes the detailed design and construction of a new 1.2- kilometre signature bridge across the Cataraqui River in Kingston, Ontario, Canada - providing a much needed third connection between communities on the east side and west sides of the river. At this location, the Cataraqui River forms part of the Rideau Canal, a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site, National Historic Site of Canada (NHSC), Canadian Heritage River, and a Federally regulated navigable waterway. This project is being funded by all three tiers of government in Canada. The new crossing will provide a connection between communities in the City of Kingston to the east and west of the Cataraqui River, improve emergency response, accommodate future growth of the city, promote active and public transportation alternatives, and enhance the Rideau Canal and life of residents and visitors of Kingston. The bridge crossing is estimated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by shortening motorist travel times by 40%. The crossing will provide an emergency detour route for the provincial Hwy 401 and southern Kingston LaSalle Causeway bridge, additional access for City services, and provide an alternative route to relieve congestion over the LaSalle Causeway bridge and during closures. In accordance with the approved Environmental Assessment, the bridge is designed for a minimum 100-year design life, which exceeds the minimum 75-year design life requirement of the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code. A longer service life will provide long-term environmental and economic benefits. Its design will reflect many aesthetic ideas that build on the central ideal of "light and low," an observation of the balance between the beauty of the Bridge and how it enhances the beauty of the landscape which it serves.

City of Calgary - 9 Avenue S. E. Bridge Replacement

Thu, 05/18/2023 - 17:52
City of Calgary - 9 Avenue S. E. Bridge Replacement
City of Calgary.
2023.
CA6 ARH330 2023N31 - INTERNET


The 9 Avenue S.E. Bridge over the Elbow River is located in Calgary's inner city and provides a gateway between the city's oldest neighbourhood, Inglewood, and the Downtown East Village. The bridge provides a connection to many recreational opportunities and amenities in the surrounding area, such as the Fort Calgary grounds and plaza connecting to the RiverWalk pathway system to the northwest; the historic Deane House property and a regional pathway to the northeast; and Statue Park, which is located directly southeast of the bridge. The original bridge crossing was a Parker-Camelback through truss built in 1909 by Algoma Steel and included in the Inventory of Calgary Historic Resources. It was originally built to facilitate a streetcar connecting Inglewood to Fort Calgary and had undergone numerous modifications and rehabilitation measures as a vehicle bridge. By 2017, the original 1909 historical camelback truss had reached the end of its practical service life and required in situ replacement, without disrupting traffic flow for the more than 20,000 vehicles and buses that travel along 9 Avenue S.E. daily. The bridge crossing posed a significant engineering and construction staging challenge. The site is bounded by numerous constraints, including the historic Fort Calgary and Deane House properties, a Canadian Pacific Railway mainline, extensive underground and overhead utility conflicts (including a major natural gas pipeline, 911 telecom fibre lines and a 138kV power distribution line), sensitive aquatic habitats, restricted work periods within the Elbow River and contaminated soils. These challenges were heightened by initial hydrotechnical modelling indicating that the elevation of the existing camelback through-truss was within the 1-100 year flood level of the Elbow River. This required the replacement bridge to be constructed to a higher deck elevation to provide sufficient flood clearance. A higher deck elevation also required re-grading of the 9 Avenue S.E. corridor. WSP, the Prime Consultant to The City of Calgary, led an integrated multi-disciplinary team of engineers (COWI, Tetra Tech, MP&P) and architects (Sturgess, W Architecture). The team delivered the design and construction administration services of the replacement bridge structure and associated civil works, including adjacent road works, park and habitat restoration features and regional pathway construction. Design of a replacement bridge required careful balancing to select a structural form that was constructible but also celebrates the significance of the crossing as a natural gateway.

Metrolinx Vegetation and Compensation Program

Wed, 05/17/2023 - 19:48
Metrolinx Vegetation and Compensation Program
Metrolinx.
2023.
CA6 ARH325 2023V21 - INTERNET


Metrolinx has an ambitious $75B+ capital program plan with projects in delivery over the next 20 years. To support a faster, more efficient, and greener transit system, some trees and vegetation will be removed to make room for new transit lines. To offset these removals, Metrolinx follows a detailed, science-based plan for planting trees and other vegetation to keep the region green and enhance the function of natural areas. Metrolinx's Vegetation Guideline specifies how many trees need to be planted when any tree is removed, ranging from 1-50 new trees, based on the size and location of the tree(s) being removed. This often goes beyond what is required by local regulations - and is completely voluntary for trees removed from Metrolinx property. The goal is to build GO Expansion sustainably, including by making sure more trees are planted than removed as we carry out the largest transit expansion in the history of the region. The guideline was developed to address the removals associated with electrifying some existing rail lines, but the success of the program led Metrolinx to apply it on all Metrolinx projects.

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