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Goods Movement in Ottawa: Transitioning to a Sustainable Future

Tue, 11/12/2019 - 20:50
Goods Movement in Ottawa: Transitioning to a Sustainable Future
by Kriger,D; Edwards,N.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5130 - INTERNET


Most Canadian urban areas promote a more sustainable future in their long-range transportation master plans (TMPs). This applies to all urban travel, but most TMPs consider goods movement at a high level, if at all. To address this gap, the City of Ottawa commissioned a study of goods movement. The study will inform Ottawa’s upcoming transportation policies and plans. Other urban areas have developed stand-alone goods movement strategies. These strategies typically look at current and long-term issues, and recommend packages of operational, regulatory, technological, planning and policy solutions that can be implemented over time. Many of the packages consider sustainability but, again, at a high level. Ottawa’s goods movement study looks at a range of opportunities, but it differs from other Canadian goods movement studies in that it focuses on sustainability and ways to transition to a sustainable transportation future. The Ottawa study does not recommend solutions but instead presents opportunities that the City can consider in its policies and plans. It should be noted that the study looked at goods movement within, to and from Ottawa, although it did not look at interregional goods movement through the city. The Ottawa study looks at how sustainability can be incorporated through short-term operational and traffic management improvements and through long-term policies and land use planning. It looks at how goods movement is incorporated in today’s sustainability initiatives, such as Complete Streets rehabilitations of urban streets and intersections, along with some of the current challenges faced by couriers and truckers and how these might be resolved. The study considers the potential role of emerging goods movement technologies, such as connected and autonomous vehicles, in promoting sustainable urban goods movement in the future, while accounting for the inherent uncertainties associated with industry uptake of new technologies and trends such as e-commerce and the growing role of independents in urban deliveries. Finally, the study looks at how these actions can be integrated to transition to a more sustainable future over time, while recognizing market realities, the need to maintain economic sustainability and the uncertainties associated with emerging technologies. The paper speaks to all these aspects by providing an overview of the Ottawa study’s goals, how its focus on sustainability differs from other Canadian urban goods movement studies, how economic/business and other realities must be considered, and how current opportunities and emerging technologies can set the stage for long-term sustainability initiatives.

Geocell-Reinforced Pavement Structure State of Practice in Canada

Tue, 11/12/2019 - 20:35
Geocell-Reinforced Pavement Structure State of Practice in Canada
by Norouzi,M; Pokharel,S; Breault,M.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5129 - INTERNET


Geocell reinforcement at the base and subbase courses of pavement structures is one of the recent developments in the field of geosynthetics soil reinforcement. Geocells are honeycomb-shaped three-dimensional materials usually made from polymeric alloys and High-Density Polyethylene. Geocells improve the modulus and strength of the reinforced soil composite and durability of the road structure by providing lateral confinement, wider load distribution and also through a semi-rigid slab or beam effect. Novel Polymeric Alloy (NPA) is the latest technology used as geocell material which provide increase tensile strength, higher modulus and creep resistance compared to the geocells made from other types of material. Geocells can be used in both paved and unpaved roads contributing to the sustainability of the project by reducing the overall thickness of the pavement structure and decreasing the amount of virgin aggregate required. This in turn decreases the environmental footprint of the project and reduces the overall construction cost. Over the past decade a number of roads (paved and unpaved) have been constructed in Canada using the NPA geocell reinforcement. This paper discusses the current state of the practice in designing pavement structure with geocells. Few projects designed with geocell reinforcement are also discussed in detail to provide insight into the challenges faced during construction, long-term performance of the geocell-reinforced pavement structure and contribution of the geocell in each project to reduce environmental footprint and construction cost of the projects. In summary geocells have enabled the owners to save on the construction cost and lower the CO2 emission associated with the construction while improving the pavement performance and reducing pavement distresses.

Forensic Evaluation - Southwest Anthony Henday Drive's Portland Cement Concrete Pavement

Tue, 11/12/2019 - 20:19
Forensic Evaluation - Southwest Anthony Henday Drive's Portland Cement Concrete Pavement
by Sharma,V; Reggin,A; Juhasz,M; Mah,W.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5128 - INTERNET


A 14-kilometre-long section of Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement along Southwest Anthony Henday Drive (SWAHD) in Edmonton, Alberta with was opened to traffic in 2006. Since opening, the roadway has experienced a significant increase in traffic volume. The PCC pavement consists of a doweled jointed plain concrete and presently the performance of the pavement is poor relative to expectations of a longer life pavement. The condition of the pavement is fair to poor, with smoothness (ride quality) a major concern. The pavement exhibited joint sealant loss soon after construction and, six years after construction, major rehabilitation activities were undertaken to address various areas exhibiting distresses and ride quality issues. The completed rehabilitation activities included partial and full depth panel replacement, cross stitching of longitudinal cracks, dowel bar placement at mid-panel transverse cracks, slab jacking, and diamond grinding. Despite the rehabilitation activities, ride quality has continued to be an issue and ongoing maintenance activities have been required to address cracked panels, drainage along the roadway, and joint resealing. Subsequently, additional investigations were undertaken in 2017. This paper presents the forensic methodology used to investigate the causes of the premature development of distresses and poor ride quality issues. Site inspections, geotechnical borehole drilling, pavement coring, ground penetrating radar (GPR) testing to determine the location of the dowel bars and presence of voids underneath the pavement, analysis of Laser Crack Measurement System (LCMS) data, historical pavement smoothness data, Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) data, drainage analysis, profile analysis using LiDAR data, along with other analyses, were undertaken for this investigation. The results of the additional investigations are presented along with potential causes of the poor performance and recommendations for rehabilitation and rehabilitation sequencing.

Operational Guidance for Magratory Birds and Vegetation Management for Existing Transportation Facilities and Infrastructure

Mon, 11/04/2019 - 18:59
Operational Guidance for Magratory Birds and Vegetation Management for Existing Transportation Facilities and Infrastructure
by Heffernan,C; Wheeler,M; Lake,R.
2019.
CA6 ARH_73 2019O64 - MAIN


Federally protected migratory birds (hereafter referenced as migratory birds) utilize almost every natural and man-made habitat found in Canada. Migratory birds, their eggs and nests are protected everywhere in Canada by the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) and its supporting Regulations. There is no regulatory provision to allow for limited take of migratory birds during activites that support the development, construction, maintenance and operation of transportation facilities. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), via the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS), encourages proponents responsible for infrastructure and other sectors, where a risk of incidental take exists, to develop beneficial management plans. This Operational Guidance (OG) document is part of a series of documents which are intended to be used alone or in conjunction with other OG documents. It will provide guidance to assist the Canadian transportation and roadway sectors in minimizing the risk of not being compliant with the Act and Regulations. Guidance provided in this OG document is intended to be non-prescriptive and will allow for the flexible application of principles for a variety of contexts. OGs are intended to be utilized at Step 2 of the Risk Management Framework (RMF). Proponents undertaking bridge and culvert infrastructure improvement activities are encouraged to review the report titled “Beneficial Practices for Compliance with the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations” (Transportation Association of Canada, 2019) prior to using and applying this OG document.

Operational Guidance for Migratory Bird Nests under Bridges and in Culverts

Mon, 11/04/2019 - 18:50
Operational Guidance for Migratory Bird Nests under Bridges and in Culverts
by Heffernan,C; Wheeler,M; Lake,R.
2019.
CA6 ARH_73 2019O63 - MAIN


Federally protected migratory birds (hereafter referenced as migratory birds) utilize almost every natural and man-made habitat found in Canada. Migratory birds, their eggs and nests are protected everywhere in Canada by the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) and its supporting Regulations. There is no regulatory provision to allow for limited take of migratory birds during activites that support the development, construction, maintenance and operation of transportation facilities. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), via the Canadian Wildife Service (CWS), encourages proponents responsible for infrastructure and other sectors, where a risk of incidental take exists, to develop beneficial management plans. This Operational Guidance (OG) document is part of a series of documents which are intended to be used alone or in conjunction with other OG documents. It will provide guidance to assist the Canadian transportation and roadway sectors in minimizing the risk of not being compliant with the Act and Regulations. Guidance provided in this OG document is intended to be non-prescriptive and will allow for the flexible application of principles for a variety of contexts. OGs are intended to be utilized at Step 2 of the Risk Management Framework (RMF). Proponents undertaking bridge and culvert infrastructure improvement activities are encouraged to review the report titled “Beneficial Practices for Compliance with the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations” (Transportation Association of Canada, 2019) prior to using and applying this OG document.

Beneficial Practices for Compliance with teh Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations

Mon, 11/04/2019 - 18:41
Beneficial Practices for Compliance with teh Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations
by Heffernan,C; Wheeler,M; King,J; Lunn,H; McIntosh,S; Lake,R.
2019.
CA6 ARH_73 2019B26 - MAIN


Federally protected migratory birds (hereafter referenced as migratory birds) utilize almost every natural and man-made habitat found in Canada. Migratory birds, their eggs and nests are protected everywhere in Canada by the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) and its supporting Regulations. There is no regulatory provision to allow for limited take of migratory birds during activites that support the development, construction, maintenance and operation of transportation facilities. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), via the Canadian Wildife Service (CWS), encourages proponents responsible for infrastructure and other sectors, where a risk of incidental take exists, to develop beneficial management plans. This report provides an overview of legislation, a primer on migratory bird biology, case studies to illustrate actions taken to reduce the risk of incidental take, as well as a synthesis of beneficial practices that aligns with the Act and Regulations. This report forms the first phase (Phase 1) of this project. It provides the foundation for carrying out the second phase (Phase 2) of the project which will involve the development of a national-level Canadian transportation and roadway sector-specific guidance on compliance with the MBCA and Regulations. Recommendations to suggest ways to carry out Phase 2 are presented in this report.

Effects of Modifiers and Binder Properties on the Performance of Asphalt Mixtures in the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device Test

Sat, 11/02/2019 - 19:30
Effects of Modifiers and Binder Properties on the Performance of Asphalt Mixtures in the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device Test
by Lv,Q; Bahia,HU; Huang,W; Tang,N; Zheng,M.
2018.
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018.
US6 AFN___ 2018P04 - MAIN


The Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device (HWTD) test has been widely used in practice and reported to be successful in identifying hot mix asphalt (HMA) mixes that are prone to rutting and/or susceptible to moisture damage. This paper presents a comprehensive study aiming to offer informative references for pavement engineers to select modified asphalt materials with good moisture and rutting resistance. First, the impacts of these modifiers on the HWTD test results were investigated. Based on the degree of their improvement in the HWTD results, additives were classified into the following three grades: (1) the first grade including branched styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and Gilsonite; (2) the second grade including linear SBS, high-density polyethylene, and polyphosphoric acid; and (3) the third grade including asphalt rubber (AR) and terminal blend (TB) asphalt rubber. In addition, the effects of modifier content on the Hamburg performance of the asphalt mixes were studied. It was found that higher modifier dosages do not necessarily result in the improvement of Hamburg performance. The results show that an optimal content existed for most additives, whereas a poor-performance dosage range (10.0% - 18.0%) existed for crumb rubber content in the AR. Finally, based on the results of the various test materials, the roles of different properties of modified asphalt binders on the Hamburg performance were also investigated. The healing, adhesive, viscosity, and elastic properties (HAVE) of modified binders were found to play different roles: the healing property of modified asphalt binder is a necessary factor; the adhesive property is a fundamental factor; the viscosity has a maximum limitation (3.5 Pa s at 135 deg C); and the elastic property due to the modification is the determining factor in achieving good Hamburg performance of modified asphalt mixtures.

Fleet Weather Map - A Project to Integrate Floating Car Weather Data into the Field of Automated Driving

Sat, 10/12/2019 - 19:59
Fleet Weather Map - A Project to Integrate Floating Car Weather Data into the Field of Automated Driving
by Hellweg,M; Nachtigall,J; Kratzsch,T; Potthast,R; Riede,H; Paschalidi,Z; Bouras,A; Acevedo,W; Stiller,C.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5127 - INTERNET


To lay the foundations for safe autonomous driving, detailed information about the current and upcoming weather conditions is needed. However, currently available wide-meshed weather data are insufficient to meet the necessary spatial and temporal resolution required. On the other hand economic constraints limit the extension of the observations network. The project presented in this paper explores to what extent vehicular sensor data may augment existing data sources to improve weather forecasting and nowcasting in general but for the road network in particular. This paper illustrates the limited applicability of raw sensor readings due to the impact of vehicle dynamics and a continuously changing environment. Subsequently, it investigates methods for filtering and adjustments to meet meteorological requirements. A preliminary, physically modelled algorithm focused on estimating a representative ambient temperature shows promising results in comparison to synoptic reference data. The paper closes with an analysis of further refinements and a continuous validation required as well as the need for further meteorological quantities that need to be integrated to complete a typical meteorological data collective.

Field compaction of thick recycled material layers

Sat, 10/12/2019 - 19:29
Field compaction of thick recycled material layers
by Bilodeau,JP; Carrier,V; Doré,G.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5126 - INTERNET


Full-depth reclamation techniques present numerous advantages in pavement rehabilitation. Typically, a thick layer of stabilized or unstabilized reclaimed materials is left behind the recycling machine, which is used as the base layer consisting of these latter recycled asphalt pavement material (RAP). The compaction of the thick layer, especially when unstabilized, is particularly critical for adequate performance. In Quebec, the smooth drum compaction is often used to compact the reclaimed materials. Previous studies demonstrated the difficulties associated with the convenient compaction of the reclaimed materials through its entire thickness, especially the presence of a vertical compaction gradient. Sheep or pad foot compactors are two common compaction machines used to ensure good densification during primary compaction of recycled materials. A research project was initiated to document and quantify the effects of compaction conditions and equipment on the response and performance of the reclaimed materials. An experimental embankment of reclaimed materials was built and divided in three sections compacted using different compaction procedures. Sheepsfoot roller, with and without vibration, was used in the first two sections, while the third section was compacted using a vibrating smooth drum roller. The density, stiffness and vertical density gradient were monitored with a nuclear gage, dynamic cone penetrometer and light weight deflectometer tests. Grain-size analysis was also performed on all experimental sections. The use of vibration along with Sheepsfoot roller improved both density and mechanical response of the compacted layer significantly. The penetration and density tests also revealed a significant difference in compaction throughout the thick layer of reclaimed materials. Using the sheepsfoot provided a stiffer base layer, and the smooth drum resulted in a vertical density gradient. Finally, significant differences in the grainsize distribution were found following the compaction when the sheepsfoot compactor was used.

Fermor Avenue and Kingsclear First Nation Pedestrian-Cyclist Underpasses - Case Studies on Improved Safety for VRUs

Sat, 10/12/2019 - 19:12
Fermor Avenue and Kingsclear First Nation Pedestrian-Cyclist Underpasses - Case Studies on Improved Safety for VRUs
by Amorim,DRC; Crang,JN; Dunbar,RC; Tapia,JA.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5125 - INTERNET


This paper presents case studies of two recently completed pedestrian-cyclist underpasses projects in Canada – the Fermor Avenue underpass located in Winnipeg, Manitoba and the Kingsclear First Nation (KFN) underpass located in KFN, New Brunswick. These projects are evidence that pedestrian-cyclist underpasses can be successfully implemented, despite their generally negative reputations, provided that user comfort and safety remain at the forefront throughout the design process. Crossing under the TransCanada Highway, the Fermor underpass is a 6.0m wide x 3.0m high cast-in-place concrete box structure constructed over two years in two stages. The structure type was selected following a conceptual design study comparing underbridge pathway, overpass, and underpass options. The final design features long and comforting sightlines along its approach pathways and is well lit with attractive vandal resistance lighting fixtures allowing users to completely see through to the other side of the 37m long underpass. The box structure entrances feature 17m long cantilevered cast-in-place concrete headwalls complete with aesthetic treatments – the walls are constructed perpendicular to the box structure to avoid the ‘funnelling-in’ sensation typically associated with these structures. While the overall cost of the Fermor structure and associated works will not be insignificant – and possibly much more than many jurisdictions are able to spend on a similar structure– successful underpasses can be constructed economically and rapidly as evidenced by the KFN underpass project. Crossing under the high-speed Highway NB-102 which bisects the community of KFN, the KFN underpass is a 3.0m wide x 3.0m tall precast concrete box structure which developed from a conceptual level to substantially constructed and opened to traffic in under three months. The structure was built in response to a fatal vehicular-pedestrian strike in September 2018 after numerous years of unsuccessful lobbying by the Community to lower the speed-limit along Highway NB-102. The structure was operational before the end of 2018. The project was spearheaded by the Community in partnership with their Joint Venture with significant labour (over 40%) provided by community members. The project works included the 32m long structure featuring vandal resistance lighting fixtures and attractive precast concrete block wingwalls, 100m of paved active-transportation pathways complete with landscape lighting, and a security system with a direct feed to the nearby KFN Band Hall. Constructed rapidly and at a minimal cost, this underpass will have a significant impact on the Community.

Examining the Effect of Coarse Recycled Concrete Aggregate on Moisture Damage Resistance of HMA Mixtures

Sat, 10/12/2019 - 18:58
Examining the Effect of Coarse Recycled Concrete Aggregate on Moisture Damage Resistance of HMA Mixtures
by Al-Bayati,HKA; Tighe,SL.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5124 - INTERNET


Moisture damage in asphalt mixtures has become a widely discussed topic due to its high influence on asphalt mixture behavior. Moisture damage is a phenomenon that relates to the loss of stiffness and strength of asphalt mixtures because of exposure to moisture under the influence of mechanical loading of traffic, which results in what is known as stripping. Moisture damage that leads to the deterioration in the integrity of asphalt pavement plays a key role in the occurrence of other distress types including fatigue cracking, rutting, etc. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the influence of the addition of coarse recycled concrete aggregate (CRCA) on the tensile strength and moisture sensitivity of Ontario Superpave mixtures. Mix designs of asphalt mixtures were performed for two types of CRCA at various proportions (0%, 15%, 30%, and 60%). The impact of CRCA types on the tensile strength and moisture sensitivity of asphalt mixtures were evaluated. The obtained results also are statistically analyzed. The findings showed that the tensile strength of hot mix asphalt (HMA) mixtures that included different CRCA types with various proportions have higher values than the control mix. Additionally, the laboratory outcomes revealed that all TSR values for mixtures that included different CRCA types with various percentages are higher than the minimum required value of MTO specifications. This indicated a highly successful performance for these mixtures that included CRCA. The results of the ANOVA analysis showed that there is a statistically insignificant effect of CRCA type, and proportion on the TSR. However, the type of CRCA has a higher effect on the results of TSR compared to the CRCA percentage.

Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Technology for Urban Pavement Rehabilitation Projects

Sat, 10/12/2019 - 18:31
Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Technology for Urban Pavement Rehabilitation Projects
by Materu,S; Shalaby,A; Ghazy,A; Kibbins,B.
2019.
Transportation Association of Canada and ITS Canada 2019 Joint Conference and Exhibition.
CA6 ARH_10 2019A5123 - INTERNET


In northern climate, asphalt paving season is relatively short, and paving is often done late in the season when weather conditions are less than ideal. Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology has the capability of lowering the temperature at which the asphalt is mixed and compacted by 30°C or more without compromising the performance of asphalt pavement. The reduced difference between asphalt mix and ambient temperature results to a lower cooling rate thus allowing long haul, sufficient compaction time and late season projects compared to the conventional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). This potential benefit means, among others, an extended paving season for the City of Winnipeg. Reduction in production temperature also generates other positive impacts both economically and environmentally. The objective of this study is to evaluate the installation of WMA to compile experiences with this technology and evaluate their effects on construction methods and performance. The study further attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of the WMA chemical additives and its dosage rate as liquid anti-strip agents on the properties of WMA mixtures through field and laboratory testing program. In addition to the overall effectiveness of WMA, the study aimed to evaluate its economic cost relative to Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). Three WMA mixtures using three different chemical additive dosages (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 percent by weight of asphalt cement) were tested. Among the different additive dosage used, the 0.5% had a better overall performance. The moisture sensitivity tests indicated the highest Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR) at this dosage, suggesting the lowest moisture damage susceptibility. The study also showed that WMA can be successfully placed using conventional HMA paving practices and procedures. The WMA price was between 2% to 11% higher than conventional HMA including the costs of additional testing as well as the WMA additives. It is expected that in future large paving contracts, the cost of WMA will decrease when the contracts do not include the additional testing and contractors realize the financial benefit of reduced energy consumption in the production of WMA.

Guide canadien de modération de la circulation

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 17:33
Guide canadien de modération de la circulation
by Solomon,H; Malone,B; Garcia,J; Bottesini,G; Hoeun,S; Chartier,G.
Deuxième édition.
2018.
CA6 ARH_65 2018C13Z - MAIN


Ce guide présente la modération de la circulation en tant que méthode de réduction de la vitesse et du débit de la circulation non locale qui s’infiltre dans les quartiers. Il présente les principes de modération de la circulation, il suggère un processus d’introduction et de mise en place de la modération de la circulation, et il décrit l’applicabilité, l’efficacité et le principe de conception pour une vaste gamme de dispositifs de modération de la circulation. Ces dispositifs sont classés dans les catégories suivantes : déviation verticale, déviation horizontale, rétrécissement de la route, traitement de surface, marques sur chaussée, restriction de l’accès, portes d’entrée, application de la loi, information, espace partagé, nouvelles technologies et mesures.

Guide de contrôle des passages pour piétons - Troisième édition

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 17:20
Guide de contrôle des passages pour piétons - Troisième édition
by Montufar,J; Patmore.K; Bahar,G.
2018.
CA6 ARH_65 2018P21Z - MAIN


La marche est une activité vitale qui nécessite une infrastructure adéquate, élément central d’un réseau de transport durable, équitable et sécuritaire. Le contrôle des passages pour piétons représente un défi pour les ingénieurs en circulation, urbanistes, concepteurs de routes et autres, compte tenu de la nécessité de répondre, en toute sécurité, aux besoins des piétons d’une manière qui soit en interrelation avec les autres utilisateurs du réseau de transport. Le Guide de contrôle des passages pour piétons a été élaboré principalement pour compléter l’information sur les dispositifs de contrôle des passages pour piétons et leurs applications figurant dans le Manuel canadien de la signalisation routière (MCSR). Son principal objectif est de favoriser une approche uniforme dans tout le pays relativement au contrôle des passages pour piétons. Pour ce faire, un outil d’aide à la décision a été développé afin de faciliter le processus de prise de décisions au moment de déterminer la nécessité de réguler la circulation, afin de permettre aux piétons de traverser la route en toute sécurité, et de déterminer le type de dispositif de signalisation le plus adéquat pour la section de la route visée, l’exposition aux véhicules et la demande en matière de circulation piétonne.

Best Practices for Pothole Repairs in Canada

Tue, 08/20/2019 - 20:33
Best Practices for Pothole Repairs in Canada
by Hein,D; D'Ippolito,R; Olidis,C.
2019.
CA6 ARH_62 2019B26 - MAIN


Every year, through the winter/spring seasons, potholes appear with detrimental effects to roadway structure, vehicles and driver comfort. Potholes are the result of small area defects or deterioration in the pavement which may require reactive, “emergency” repair, followed by more substantial permanent repairs when weather conditions improve. This Guide identifies current Canadian agency practices with respect to pothole repair and outlines best practices from both Canadian and international agencies. Recommendations are provided for appropriate temporary and long-term patching strategies for spring, summer and winter and for evaluating and selecting appropriate patching products that will lead to the improved performance of chip seal, asphalt and concrete surfaced roadways for Canadian climate conditions. This Guide also provides recommended guidelines for the evaluation of new patching products and their compatibility with native road surfaces.

Low Emission2 Asphalt Pavement

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 20:41
Low Emission2 Asphalt Pavement
by Huurman,M; Demmink,E; Qiu,J; de Briun,B; Kuijper,C; Kersten,H.
2018.
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018.
US6 AFN___ 2018P03 - MAIN


This article presents the results of the LE2AP Life+ project. LE2AP is acronym for Low Emission2 Asphalt Pavement, where the 2 indicates that emission of pollutants and noise are considered. LE2AP concentrates on a novel way of circular-asphalt recycling. Key issues in LE2AP are that reclaimed asphalt is first decomposed into its components. Reclaimed aggregates hardly containing bitumen and bitumen rich mortar sand, which is a mixture of bitumen, filler and sand, are obtained. The mortar sand is used as the main ingredient for quality LE2AP mortar. During production LE2AP mortar is heated without meeting a flame or superheated air and is homogenized and treated with rejuvenator and soft bitumen. LE2AP mortar is then foamed and fed into the mixer where it is mixed with reclaimed stone at 100-110 deg C to obtain an asphalt mixture of high quality, containing a high percentage of reclaimed material and produced at low temperature. The LE2AP project is partially funded by a LIFE+ grant and it is believed that LE2AP may contribute to much needed circular asphalt recycling at lowered temperature and low emissions. LE2AP came to provisory conclusions in October/November 2016 with the installation of two two-layer PA, porous asphalt, test sections with a combined length of 2.3 km. Key properties of these test sections are: production temperature: ll0-125 deg C, noise reduction: 5.3-8.4 dB(A), re-use: 82%-93%, CO2 reduction: 51%. The performance of the test sections is being monitored and until now (September 2017) the sections perform well.

Laboratory and Full Scale Evaluation of Recycled and Warm Mix Asphalts

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 15:15
Laboratory and Full Scale Evaluation of Recycled and Warm Mix Asphalts
by Li,X; Andriescu,A; Carvalho,R; Youtcheff,J.
2018.
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018.
US6 AFN___ 2018P02 - MAIN


This study evaluated the cracking characteristics of asphalt materials containing RAP/RAS and prepared with WMA technology. Tests were performed in the laboratory and at A full-scale testing facility. Ten test lanes were built at FHWA's Accelerated Loading Facility (ALF). The experimental design included three RAP percentages up to 44% by weight (40% recycled binder ratio, RBR), two WMA technologies (water foaming and chemical additive), one RAS percentage with 20% RBR, and two different virgin binders (PG 58-28 and PG 64-22). Specimens prepared from loose mixes sampled from the construction and field cores sampled at different times were evaluated using the direct tension monotonic test. Performance grade and cracking resistance of asphalt binders recovered from tested loose mix and field cores were determined. The laboratory monotonic testing results were compared to and statistically correlated to the ALF field cracking performance. Experimental results from both laboratory mix and binder tests capture the oxidative aging that occurs with time in the top lift. Aging observed in the bottom lift of the asphalt pavement was considerably less. One of the mechanical parameters developed from the mix monotonic test closely correlated with the binder tolerance strain obtained from the binder DENT test. Long-term oven aging aged the mix significantly more severely than was observed in three-year old ALF sections. Testing of ALF materials shows that the mixtures with 40% MP RBR or 20% MS RBR and stiff binder exhibited the worst cracking performance. A softer PG grade was found to be effective at improving the performance for 40% RAP RBR mixes but ineffective at improving the performance of 20% RAS RBR mix. No difference in field performance was observed between the HMA and WMA mixtures having the same mix design. Statistical analysis indicated a strong correlation between the direct tension monotonic mix test and ALF field testing in terms of evaluating the cracking resistance of the asphalt mixtures containing RAP/RAS and produced as HMA or WMA.

Increasing Asphalt Pavement Density Through Mixture Design: A Field Project

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 14:19
Increasing Asphalt Pavement Density Through Mixture Design: A Field Project
by Montoya,MA; Pouranian,MR; Haddock,JE.
2018.
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018.
US6 AFN___ 2018P01 - MAIN


Modifying the asphalt mixture design appears to be a viable method for obtaining improvements in pavement durability. This paper reports a demonstration project focused on achieving an optimal 95 percent in-place density through a modified mixture design. The project tasks included-milling and overlaying an existing pavement in Indiana. Control and test mixtures were used to evaluate the effect of mixture design modifications on the asphalt pavement construction performance. The control mixture was designed in the laboratory at '4 percent air voids using the conventional Superpave volumetric mixture design method ln contrast, the test mixture was prepared at 5% air voids using a modified laboratory mixture design. Quality control and quality assurance data analysis reported a 93.3 and 95.3 percent in-place density average for the control mixture and test mixture, respectively. Additionally, new 'probabilistic and analytical metrics are proposed to compare the construction performance of both mixtures. The findings of this field study validate the potential benefits of using a modified mixture design to construct asphalt pavements with increased densities. Implementation of this methodology can be easily accomplished using conventional laboratory and construction equipment.

Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 13:41
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018
2018.
Asphalt Paving Technology 2018: Journal of the Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists - Jacksonville, Florida, March 18-21, 2018.
US6 AFN___ 2018P01-24 - MAIN

Competition in the Canadian Taxi Industry

Thu, 07/11/2019 - 19:55
Competition in the Canadian Taxi Industry
by Monteiro,J; Prentice,BE.
2018.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 53rd Annual Conference - The Future of Canada's Transportation System//L'avenir du systéme de transport du Canada - Gatineau, Québec, June 3-6, 2018.
CA6 AIP_10 2018P31 - INTERNET


This paper examines the taxi industry in Canada. The analysis considers the economic model of regulation, the Competition Bureau‘s advocacy of competition in the taxi industry, and the competitive struggle between the regulated taxi industry and the Transportation Network Companies (TNCs).

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