Home

TAC Library

Subscribe to TAC Library feed
New TAC Library Materials.
Updated: 36 min 18 sec ago

Creation of the Bonshaw Hills Provincial Park and Protection of Provincially Owned Land

Wed, 10/25/2017 - 21:31
Creation of the Bonshaw Hills Provincial Park and Protection of Provincially Owned Land
by Thompson,B.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5119 - INTERNET


The Bonshaw Hills Public Lands Committee is a multi-stakeholder committee, comprised of government and non-government individuals, representing organizations from the Transportation, Tourism, Conservation, Education, Trail Building and Cycling communities. This Committee, through its work which began in January, 2013 has successfully protected more than 600 acres of public land under the Natural Areas Protection Act, constructed more than 20 kms of multi use trail on public land, and constructed a natural playground for the enjoyment and use of all.

CPR Yards Functional Design Crossing Study

Tue, 10/24/2017 - 22:36
CPR Yards Functional Design Crossing Study
by Boissonneault,M; Amy,K; Suderman,S.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5118 - INTERNET


Stantec was retained by the City of Winnipeg to complete a Functional Design Crossing Study over the CPR Yards located in North West Winnipeg. The Yards were constructed in the late 1800s at the outer limits of the City. Over one hundred years later, the Yards seem to divide the North End community of Winnipeg. There are three existing crossings over the 5km long and 1km wide Yards, located along McPhillips, Arlington and Salter Streets. The existing 37 span Arlington Street Bridge, constructed in 1912, is at the end of its functional life and is proposed to be decommissioned in approximately 5 years. The intent of the study was to develop a cost effective functional transportation plan for the removal of the existing Arlington Street Bridge and a preliminary decommissioning plan for the existing Bridge. Considering vehicular and active modes of transportation the transportation plan determined if and where a new crossing would be optimally located. The study addressed railway yard operations and coordination for the proposed decommissioning and new crossing construction. The transportation plan considered current and estimated traffic volumes in 2031. CPR was involved in the development of the decommissioning plan, which consisted of the removal of the spans in 6 - 10 hour track blocks via SPMT methods, as well as the new crossing concepts. The paper will discuss the plan in detail and how we addressed transportation and CPR requirements.

Conservation Dogs to Detect Blanding’s Turtle Nests prior to Road Rehabilitation Activities

Tue, 10/24/2017 - 22:36
Conservation Dogs to Detect Blanding’s Turtle Nests prior to Road Rehabilitation Activities
by Priddle,M.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5117 - INTERNET


Blanding’s Turtles nest in the granular shoulders of roadways, burying eggs beneath the ground surface. Visual detection of nests is not possible. Highway rehabilitation can damage or destroy eggs from May 21 to October 31. Detection dogs were trained in Ontario to locate Blanding’s Turtles nests, a federally and provincially listed Species at Risk, along roadways. This work contributes directly to environmental protection during road infrastructure renewal and conservation of species at risk turtles.

Concrete Sidewalk Design Analysis and Optimization for Improved Life Cycle and Sustainability

Tue, 10/24/2017 - 22:36
Concrete Sidewalk Design Analysis and Optimization for Improved Life Cycle and Sustainability
by Czarnecki,B; Poon,B.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5116 - INTERNET


The City of Calgary (The City) has a multimillion-dollar sidewalk replacement backlog. The condition-based preventive maintenance and the corrective maintenance are faced with challenges with limited manpower to conduct condition assessments and funding for sidewalk maintenance. A survey of the current sidewalk designs specified across major municipalities in Canada confirmed that the sidewalk structure in Calgary, including concrete thickness and the use of granular base materials, is one of the thinnest. The most common sidewalk damage/failure patterns in cold climates are well recognized, but the impact of the sidewalk design on the service life and the maintenance needs relies predominantly on limited inspections and reporting process for the asset. The structural assessment of different sidewalk designs was conducted using the finite element analysis (FEA). The model inputs were selected based on local climate and variations in concrete thickness, base material thickness, and soil conditions. A total of 36 models were analyzed for structural adequacy and the findings of the FEA formed the basis for the Best Construction Practices recommendations for concrete sidewalks in Calgary. The rationale behind the recommended changes to the sidewalk structure is discussed in conjunction with the need for a more stringent quality assurance and verification process. The life cycle cost analysis of selected designs is provided. The importance of data management to assess the effectiveness of the sidewalk repairs and to determine the rate of sidewalk deterioration is recognized.

Comparison between AASHTO and CHBDC Design Methods for MSE Retaining Wall and its Implications on Transportation Agencies

Mon, 10/23/2017 - 20:36
Comparison between AASHTO and CHBDC Design Methods for MSE Retaining Wall and its Implications on Transportation Agencies
by Essery,D; Taylor,TP; El-Sharnouby,M.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5115 - INTERNET


Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) structures have been used in their current form since the early 1970s. MSE structures have become the solution of choice over traditional retaining wall systems due to their reduced material costs, ease of installation, and improved performance. This results in a retaining wall system that has a reduced carbon footprint when compared to other retaining wall systems such as Cast-in-Place wall systems. Design of MSE structures has progressed from using the Allowable Stress Design(ASD) method to the Load and Resistance Factored Design (LRFD) method. The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Official (AASHTO) implemented the LRFD method to design MSE structures in 2002 and has established load and resistance factors through calibration to the ASD method, experience and collaboration with the MSE industry. This paper will compare the design of an inextensible reinforced MSE wall system using the latest edition of Canadian Highway Bridge Code (CHBDC, CAN/CSA-S6-14) to the AASHTO (2014) LRFD Bridge Design Specification. This paper will demonstrate how the CHBDC new changes increase the cost of a typical MSE structure. Indirectly, it will demonstrate the present sustainability issues being faced with the current CHBDC design method including, an increase in the steel reinforcement required to be manufacture and the additional select MSE fill that will be required to be processed and shipped to site, resulting in an increase in the carbon footprint for the structure.

Clean Roads to Clean Air Program

Mon, 10/23/2017 - 20:36
Clean Roads to Clean Air Program
City of Toronto.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5114 - INTERNET


Toronto’s Transportation Services Division (TSD) developed and implemented the Clean Roads to Clean Air Program (CRCA) in 2005. The program helped to develop procedures and standards to evaluate the operational and environmental (PM10 and PM2.5 efficiency) performance levels of various street sweeper technologies, and created a framework for continual assessment and improvement of sweeping practices. A significant outcome of the program was the development of two sweeper testing protocols: “Operational On-Street”; “PM10 and PM2.5 Street Sweeper Efficiency”; and their respective performance criteria. These two testing protocols were adopted by the Environment Canada and Climate Change (ECCC) Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV (http://etvcanada.ca/), which provides third party verification services.

Centre City Cycle Track Network Pilot Project In-Service Safety Review

Mon, 10/23/2017 - 20:36
Centre City Cycle Track Network Pilot Project In-Service Safety Review
by Patterson,B.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5113 - INTERNET


Concern for safety is one of the most important deterrents to increasing cycling. By conducting this project, the City is demonstrating its commitment to a sustainable transportation system and the high degree of importance placed on vulnerable road users in creating a safe, multi-modal transportation system. By focusing on targeted improvements to improve cycling safety, The City can help to make cycling more convenient, attractive, safe, and normal way to travel through the City. This project will help the City to achieve its targets related to increasing the mode share of sustainable transportation and reducing traffic related injuries and fatalities.

Case Studies and Innovative Uses of GPR for Pavement Engineering Applications

Mon, 10/23/2017 - 20:36
Case Studies and Innovative Uses of GPR for Pavement Engineering Applications
by Korczak,R; Abd El Halim,A.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5112 - INTERNET


Over the past few decades, advances in technology has allowed electronics and computers in general to become more portable and to be able to store more data than ever before. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a non-destructive technology that is typically associated with archaeological studies, but has recently become more prevalent in civil engineering field with applications ranging from subsurface utility detection to structural concrete assessments. The principle of GPR technology is based on the reflection/transmission of microwave electromagnetic energy and recording its response to different materials, which are governed by two physical properties of the material; electrical conductivity and dielectric constant. For reflections to occur at different material interfaces, there must be a contrast in dielectric value (reflection produced at a boundary where the dielectric value changes). During subsurface material/void detection, depending on the size of the target, there will generally be a distinct reflection due to the contrast in dielectric between the subsurface materials and the target structure. Generally, GPR data is collected using two types of systems: air-coupled and ground-coupled systems. Air-coupled systems are typically vehicle mounted and use an antenna frequency between 1.0 to 2.0 GHz which is capable of a depth of penetration ranging from 0.75 m to 0.9 m below the ground surface. There are a large variety of ground-coupled systems, but typically are mounted using a cart with single, or multiple wheels depending on the size of the antenna and must have constant contact with the surface being scanned. Antenna frequencies range from 16 to 2,600 MHz with depth of penetration ranging from 0.3 m to 50 m. This paper presents several case studies using both air-coupled and ground-coupled GPR systems in pavement engineering applications ranging from void detection, Species at Risk (SAR) investigations, subsurface utility/structure detection and concrete reinforcement detection. The results of the case studies show that GPR is a non-destructive data collection method that can be used in several different ways to collect a large amount of data over a large area relatively quickly compared to typical investigation methods (coring or drilling). It is important to understand the limitations of the equipment (signal penetration, size of target, etc.), as well as the appropriate system to use in a specific situation (air-coupled vs. ground-coupled). Ground truth data was also critical in the data analysis and interpretation of the GPR scans. Additionally, using the utility survey cart-mounted antenna in a cross-polarized orientation aided in capturing data in a steel congested structural element and allowed the GPR engineers to help identify voids.

Safety Evaluation of Cable Median Barriers in Combination with Rumble Strips on the Inside Shoulder of Divided Roads

Wed, 10/18/2017 - 20:35
Safety Evaluation of Cable Median Barriers in Combination with Rumble Strips on the Inside Shoulder of Divided Roads
by Srinivasan,R; Lan,B; Carter,D; Persaud,B; Eccles,K.
2017.
US1 DTH680 2017S12 - MAIN


The Development of Crash Modification Factors program conducted the safety evaluation of cable median barriers in combination with rumble strips on the inside shoulder of divided roads for the Evaluation of Low cost Safety Improvements pooled Fund Study. This study evaluated safety effectiveness of cable median barriers in combination with rumble strips on the inside shoulders of divided roads. This strategy is intended to reduce the frequency of cross-median crashes, which tend to be very severe. Geometric, traffic, and crash data were obtained for divided roads in Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri. To account for potential selection bias and regression-to-the-mean, an empirical Bayes before-after analysis was conducted using reference groups of untreated roads with characteristics similar to those of the treated sites. the analysis also controlled for changes in traffic volumes over time and time trends in crash counts unrelated to the treatment. In Illinois and Kentucky, cable median barriers were introduced many years after the inside shoulder rumble strips were installed; therefore, the evaluation determined the safety effect of implementing cable barriers along sections that already had rumble strips. Conversely, in Missouri, the inside shoulder rumble strips and cable barrier were implemented around the same time' Hence, the evaluation in Missouri determined the combined safety effect of inside shoulder rumble strips and cable barriers. The combined Illinois and Kentucky results indicate about a 27-percent increase in total crashes; a 24-percent decrease in fatal, incapacitating, non-incapacitating, and possible injury crashes; a 22-percent decrease in fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes; and a 48-percent decrease in head-on plus opposite-direction sideswipe crashes (used as a proxy for cross-median crashes). The results from Missouri for total and injury and fatal crashes were very similar to the combined Illinois and Kentucky results. However, the reduction in cross-median crashes in Missouri was much more dramatic, showing a 96-percent reduction (based on cross-median indicator only) and an 88-percent reduction (based on cross-median-indicator plus head-on). The economic analysis for benefit-cost ratios shows that this strategy is cost-beneficial.

Communicating Science: A Practrical Guide for Engineers and Physical Scientists

Fri, 09/29/2017 - 15:34
Communicating Science: A Practrical Guide for Engineers and Physical Scientists
by Boxman,R; Boxman,E.
2017.
US7 FWP600 2017C57 - REF


Communicating Science is a textbook and reference on scientific writing oriented primarily at researchers in the physical sciences and engineering. It is written from the perspective of an experienced researcher. It draws on the authors' experience of teaching and working with both native English speakers and English as a Second Language (ESL) writers. For the range of topics covered, this book is relatively short and tersely written, in order to appeal to busy researchers. Communicating Science offers comprehensive guidance on: Graduate students and early career researchers will be guided through the researcher's basic communication tasks: writing theses, journal papers, and internal reports, presenting lectures and posters, and preparing research proposals. Extensive best practice examples and analyses of common problems are presented. Advanced researchers who aim to commercialize their research results will be introduced to business plans and patents, so that they can communicate optimally with patent attorneys and business analysts. Likewise, advanced researchers will be assisted in conveying the results of their research to the industrial and business community, governmental circles, and the general public in the chapter on popular media.

Technical Writing: A Practical Guide for Engineers and Scientists

Thu, 09/28/2017 - 20:32
Technical Writing: A Practical Guide for Engineers and Scientists
by Laplante,PA.
2012.
What Every Engineer Should Know: vol. 47.
US7 FCT___ 2012T28 - REF


Engineers and scientists of all types are often required to write reports, summaries, manuals, guides, and so forth. While these individuals certainly have had some sort of English or writing course, it is less likely that they have had any instruction in the special requirements of technical writing. This book enables readers to write, edit, and publish materials of a technical nature, including books, articles, reports, and electronic media.

A Short Term Outlook Model for Canadian Grain Transportation Requirements

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 21:35
A Short Term Outlook Model for Canadian Grain Transportation Requirements
by Gregory,A.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P73 - INTERNET


The objective of this paper is to outline a potential framework for estimating grain tonnage through marine export corridors given an estimate for near term crop production. This methodology represents the first iteration of a short term predictive model for grain transport. The intent is to produce a monitoring tool that will provide forward looking guidance as to near term transport demand for grain. Near term is defined as the four quarters of an upcoming crop year. The end goal of the framework would be to provide an alert mechanism which will identify situations where the grain export supply chain is not performing according to its normal historical operating parameters.

Western Grain Exceptionalism: Transportation Policy Change Since 1968

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 21:35
Western Grain Exceptionalism: Transportation Policy Change Since 1968
by Earl,PD; Prentice,BE.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P72 - INTERNET


The “exceptionalism” referred to in the title of this paper is largely, but not exclusively, rooted in Canada’s grain transportation policies – and specifically rooted in the former Crow’s Nest Pass rates on grain that came into effect in 1899. Their level was originally set under an agreement between the federal government and the Canadian Pacific Railway. In 1925, the rates were legislated and extended to cover all rail movements of grain from the designated Prairie Provinces. They were more accurately called “the statutory rates,” but in everyday parlance, continued to be referred to simply as “The Crow.” Since 1982, the Crow rates have undergone several modifications, but unlike all other commodities in Canada, grain freight rates are still subject to control. The purpose of this paper is to trace grain transportation policy since the National Transportation Act (1967) and to consider the wisdom of its continuance.

Government Hopper Cars and the Canadian Grain Handling and Transportation System

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 21:35
Government Hopper Cars and the Canadian Grain Handling and Transportation System
by Pratte,S.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P71 - INTERNET


Canada’s Grain Handling and Transportation System (GHTS) is a complex, multi-actor supply chain that transports the collective output of Western Canadian grain farmers to a variety of domestic and international markets. Over the last three decades the GHTS has had to address the handling needs of a harvest that has swelled from 40 to 60 million tonnes annually. One of the critical underpinnings in this supply chain is a fleet of about 22,000 covered hopper cars that are used to gather grain from a prairie rail network spanning over 17,000 route-miles in length. This fleet is an amalgam of equipment supplied by the federal government, two provincial governments, both major railways, shippers and third-party lessors. These hopper cars also represent a mix of both old and new equipment, that vary significantly in terms of physical size and carrying capacity. This paper surveys the evolution of the current hopper-car fleet, its present condition, and its ability to provide for the future handling needs of the GHTS. Finally, it points to some of the practical considerations inherent in replacing the publicly-supplied portion of this fleet, which now represents approximately half of the cars in service, as they approach the end of their economic life.

A Survey of Awareness and Importance of Inland Port Features

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 21:35
A Survey of Awareness and Importance of Inland Port Features
by Larson,PD; Adelman,M.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P70 - INTERNET


CentrePort is an inland port initiative located in Winnipeg, and funded by the federal and provincial governments. This paper explores awareness and importance of CentrePort’s features, in the minds of local logisticians, and its connection to lean logistics. CentrePort is roughly 2,300 km. from the nearest Canadian seaports (Montreal and Vancouver), and 100 km. from the U.S. border. The paper is organized into four more sections. The first section is a literature review, covering inland ports and lean logistics. The second section outlines the research questions and methods used. Statistical results are presented in the third section. The fourth section draws conclusions, including implications for CentrePort, supply chain practitioners and public policy makers.

Analyzing the Transportation Impacts of Free Trade Agreements

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 19:34
Analyzing the Transportation Impacts of Free Trade Agreements
by Bachmann,C.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P69 - INTERNET


Canada has recently progressed several Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). The country has recently brought the Canada Korea Free Trade Agreement (CKFTA) into force, and has concluded the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) involving the Pacific Rim countries. Previous FTAs suggest sizeable impacts on Canada’s trade may be imminent. The objective of this research is to begin analyzing how CKFTA and CETA will impact Canada’s transportation infrastructure and also what the resulting capacity effects will be on Canada’s global competiveness.

Building Resilience to Counter the Impact of International Supply Chain Vulnerabilities

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 21:37
Building Resilience to Counter the Impact of International Supply Chain Vulnerabilities
by Allen,R; Whelen,M; Khan,A.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P68 - INTERNET


To satisfy one of the pre-requisites for success as a competitive trading nation and to be able to attract large-scale new investments as a part of global value chain, a trading nation’s international supply chains have to be efficient as well as resilient to potential disruptions. Around the world, policy and planning efforts are underway to achieve these objectives. As a step in this direction, this paper contributes considerations for improving resiliency of the national component of the international supply chain. Evidence-based information suggests that the national component of the international supply chain can be adversely impacted due to cascading effects of a variety of nature-induced and other events that occur beyond national borders. In order to reduce the impact of such supply chain events on industries and businesses, measures to improve resilience are to be planned and considerations for their implementation are required. In this paper, selected multimodal international supply chains are defined for non-bulk, high value groups of commodities for illustration purposes. Sources of vulnerabilities and supply chain components that are likely to be impacted are identified. The cascade of effects is traced through the supply chain using systems analysis concepts. Next, ideas are advanced on resiliency measures to counter the effect of international supply chain vulnerabilities. Illustrative examples provided are based on evidence-based information. Finally, suggestions are made on the implementation of resilience measures by stakeholders such as manufacturing industries and businesses.

Application of Vehicle Routing Optimization in Improving the Flow of Mail to a Processing Plant

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 21:37
Application of Vehicle Routing Optimization in Improving the Flow of Mail to a Processing Plant
by Iman,N; Amir,K; Matin,F.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P67 - INTERNET


A Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) involves pick-up/delivery tours generating on a network or its subsets in order to meet nodes, given a set of constraints and the need to optimize one or several fixed objectives. Network at postal services is represented as a graph on which nodes stand for customers, point of service, depot, sorting facilities while arcs stand for real links (i.e. road, rail and air services). Hence each arc has a traversing time and cost while time window and demand are associated factors to the nodes. This dynamic problem could get more sophisticated if several heterogeneous or homogenous fleets are involved at several periods. This paper presents the results from of a practical application conducted on a subset of network for a target group of customers in the Greater Toronto Region (GTA) network. The rest of this paper will describes different approaches to metaheuristics method covered in literature followed by a nobble ACO method applied for GTA case and finally concludes the paper with remarks and an insight to future works.

Resilience Measures for Reducing teh Imapct of Nature-Induced Disruptions in Transportation Supply Chains

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 21:37
Resilience Measures for Reducing teh Imapct of Nature-Induced Disruptions in Transportation Supply Chains
by Whelen,M; Khan,A; Tardif,LP; Ramsey,D.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P66 - INTERNET


The transportation system in general and the supply chain in particular is vitally important to the economy and the quality of life. A supply chain in any country has vulnerabilities and is subject to risk of disruption. In Canada, factors such as long distances, geographical diversity, geological and geotechnical characteristics of some regions, weather extremes, and long-term climate change-induced factors pose challenges, in addition to other factors such as labour disruptions. This paper describes nature-induced vulnerabilities in the Asia-Pacific Gateway Corridor (APGC) freight supply chain and defines resilience measures that could mitigate adverse effects on stakeholders. Supply chains are introduced for containerized commodities and coal, which is moved as a bulk commodity. Vulnerabilities are identified and characterized on the basis of historical evidence and scientific analysis. Finally, the need for inherent and dynamic resilience is noted. Due to space constraints, the analysis of vulnerabilities focuses on containerized imports.

Method of Data Integration for GPS and Roadside Intercept Survey Data

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 21:37
Method of Data Integration for GPS and Roadside Intercept Survey Data
by Zhu,S; Roorda,M.
2016.
Canadian Transportation Research Forum 51st Annual Conference - North American Transport Challenges in an Era of Change//Les défis des transports en Amérique du Nord à une aire de changement Toronto, Ontario, May 1-4, 2016.
CA6 AIP_10 2016P65 - INTERNET


The Commercial Vehicle Survey (CVS) has been one of Ministry of Transportation Ontario’s (MTO) main instruments for obtaining information about freight vehicle flows on the provincial transportation system. The CVS is a roadside survey that intercepts truck trips at data collection sites to gather information about inter-city truck flows as well as some urban truck flows. The survey is conducted every 5 years, and the most recent available data were collected in the period from 2010 to 2014, and is referred to as the 2012 CVS. During the survey, the intercepted truck drivers were interviewed to collect information about vehicle type, trip movement, and cargo contents. The 2012 CVS encompasses over 200 data collection sites and a total of 45,000 interviews (Ministry of Transportation Ontario, 2015). While the CVS is an extensive data collection effort, the sample collected through CVS is still a small portion of the entire truck population that flows through Ontario. A new source of data is also becoming accessible to the MTO. Probe GPS tracking data from fleet management providers such as Shaw and ATRI have a greater geographic coverage of truck movement than intercept surveys, resulting in better representation of the truck population. It is estimated that GPS data cover as much as 50% of total vehicle kilometers travelled by trucks (Ministry of Transportation Ontario, 2015). However, the GPS tracking data are collected automatically by a device on the truck without any interaction from the driver, and the device lacks intelligence to collect data with more complexity such as cargo content. In summary, the CVS contains highly detailed information about truck flows at the points of intercept but lacks population coverage, while GPS tracking data provide a wider coverage of truck movements but lack useful supplementary information about the tour. The purpose of this study is to apply data fusion methods (D'Orazio, Di Zio, & Scanu, 2006) to integrate these two data sets to produce a more useful combined source of information for modelling and policy analysis. The GPS data and the CVS data complement each other nicely in theory, but in practice the two sources of data have different levels of aggregation, sample methods, and statistical precision, all of which are common problems of data fusion (Polak, 2006). While challenges exist, the merits of data fusion are notable. First, it avoids the costly option of conducting an entirely new survey when the variables of interest exist in multiple previous surveys (Van Der Puttan, Kok, & Gupta, 2002). Second, it provides a means to analyze variables from different surveys within one platform (Bayart, Bonnel, & Morency, 2008). Third, it provides an approach to address the lack of comparability between data when a mix of survey methodologies are used (Bayart, Bonnel, & Morency, 2008).

Pages