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Pavement Performance Model Development for the Concession of the South Fraser Perimeter Road

Thu, 12/07/2017 - 21:36
Pavement Performance Model Development for the Concession of the South Fraser Perimeter Road
by Palsat,B; Reggin,A; Riessner,M; Galsworthy,I.
2016.
Proceedings of the Sixth-First Annual Conference of the Canadian Technical Asphalt Association (CTAA): Banff, Alberta.
CA6 AIH___ 2016P16 - MAIN


The increasing popularity of the Public Private Partnership (P3) procurement model for roadway corridor projects has resulted in a fundamental shift toward a performance-based design approach. Typically, an asset must be operated for a fixed period and is required to meet a prescribed set of Asset Preservation Performance Measures (APPMs) in each year of the Concession. Optimizing Operation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation (OM&R) activities to meet the APPM requirements to meet the APPM at the lowest possible costs relies heavily on the development of a set of reliable and accurate pavement condition prediction models. This paper presents an overview of the development of a distribution-based International Roughness Index (IRI) performance prediction model for the concession of the SFPR, located in the Greater Vancouver Area of British Columbia. The APPMs of the South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) were more complex than typical highway agency performance thresholds as they incorporate a distribution-based roadway condition model. To account for this added complexity, a statistical-distribution model was subsequently developed that predicts the distribution of pavement distresses in any Concession Year. This paper presents the methodology developed as part of this statistical-distribution model development.

A Paving Solution to Minimize Airport Down Time While Providing Resistance to Surface Deformation: Calgary Airport

Thu, 12/07/2017 - 20:23
A Paving Solution to Minimize Airport Down Time While Providing Resistance to Surface Deformation: Calgary Airport
by Croteau,J-M; Pianarosa,S; Harrison,T; Johnston,AG; Leroy-Mallol,F.
2016.
Proceedings of the Sixth-First Annual Conference of the Canadian Technical Asphalt Association (CTAA): Banff, Alberta.
CA6 AIH___ 2016P15 - MAIN


In the spring of 2015, the Calgary Airport Authority was looking for a paving solution to resolve a recurring surface deformation issue in the holding area of two taxiways leading to Runway 17/35. The paving solution needed to satisfy two requirements: rapidity of execution to minimize airport down time, and resistance to rutting and shoving to alleviate surface deformation. Standard General Inc - Calgary (SGIC), a subsidiary of Colas Canada Inc, proposed the usage of a paving material marketed as Betoflex(tm), bsed on the long history of successful applications within the Colas Group. The binder was formulated using the Multiple-Stress Creep-Recovery (MSCR) test to achieve a PG 58E-28 binder. The paving material was engineered as a 0-16 mm material to facilitate placement in one 100 mm thick layer and to reduce placement time. The mixture was developed using the French Level 2 methodology to ensure mixture workability and rutting resistance. This paper provides an overall perspective of the engineering of asphalt mixtures to achieve an "in service" performance. It alos discusses the differences between the French and North American approaches in mix design methodologies and why in the context of the two taxiways at the Calgary Airport, the French approach was used.

Optimize Pre-Wetting for Sustainable Winter Road Maintenance

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
Optimize Pre-Wetting for Sustainable Winter Road Maintenance
by Usman,T; Fu,L; Kaur,J; Perchanok,M; McClintock,H.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5155 - INTERNET


This research presents the findings from a field study aiming at comparing the performance of different pre wet ratios using salt for their impacts on snow melting performance/friction of road surfaces under different weather conditions. The research was motivated by the question, whether or not more sustainability can be achieved by using higher ratios of pre wetting. Field tests were conducted on three sections of a provincial highway in Southwest Ontario in the winter season 2016/2017 comparing the performance of higher pre wet ratios (10% and 20%) compared to the 5% conventional figure. Using comparative analysis, results shows that use of pre-wet salt at both 10% and 20% improves road surface conditions by approximately 10% compared to the 5% pre wet rate whereas the difference between the performance of 10% and 20% pre wet rate is minimal.

Ontario's Local Calibration of the MEPDG Distress and Performance Models for Flexible Roads: A Summary

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
Ontario's Local Calibration of the MEPDG Distress and Performance Models for Flexible Roads: A Summary
by Yuan,XX; Lee,W; Li,N.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5154 - INTERNET


This paper summarizes the research outcomes from the multiple research projects devoted to local calibration of the distress and performance models of the AASHTO Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) for Ontario’s flexible highway pavements. The study started with development of a local calibration database, which was later enhanced with a focus on Superpave sections. The permanent deformation or rutting models, fatigue cracking models, thermal cracking models, reflective cracks models, and finally the IRI models were all studied, and calibrated if every possible. The following main results are highlighted: (1) After several attempts and innovation on calibration database and calibration method development, the rutting models have been well calibrated. (2) Among the several types of cracking models, only the bottom-up fatigue cracking model has been successfully calibrated, whereas the top-down cracking, thermal cracking and reflective cracking models are still facing major challenges, reason being either a lack of reliable observation data or continuous updating status of the global models. (3) Since the thermal and reflective cracking models are subject to further development and global and local calibrations, the IRI model has been partially calibrated for its rutting and fatigue cracking terms. However, the full local calibration of the IRI model can be readily done after all cracking models are calibrated. The paper is concluded with a reflection of the work, which serves a good guide for other transportation agencies, either American or Canadian, for their local calibration study.

New Advances in Novel Polymeric Alloy Geocell-Reinforced Base Course for Paved Roads

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
New Advances in Novel Polymeric Alloy Geocell-Reinforced Base Course for Paved Roads
by Pokharel,S; Norouzi,M; Breault,M.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5153 - INTERNET


Seventh Street in Nisku industrial hub of Alberta was in very poor serviceability condition for the heavy traffic of the industrial area. In 2012, the County of Leduc decided to rehabilitate the road structure with asphalt pavement on cement treated base (CTB). Typical to most of the roads in cold climatic regions the conventionally designed CTB work satisfactorily at the beginning but start to show signs of failure as soon as the first freeze-thaw cycle completes with block cracks and other forms of pavement distress. To find a reliable solution to the problem the County decided to install a trial section with a Nano Polymeric Alloy (NPA) geocell-reinforced granular base and compare the performance over time with the conventional practice of CTB. Commercially available higher strength geocells made from NPA material were used to reinforce the base course. Two test sections were constructed over a total stretch of 1000m of the road, 500m each of the CTB and NPA geocell-reinforced granular base on either side of the railway track. The University of Alberta conducted initial research and monitoring on the test sections. During the following years, non-destructive testing and monitoring of both the sections was carried out by the Leduc County employing independent organizations. Monitoring of the tests sections conducted after consecutive freeze-thaw season have demonstrated the increasing benefit of using NPA geocells over CTB. This paper discusses the construction, immediate tests and monitoring done over three years on the road and compares the performance based on the findings.

Moving Forward with Winnipeg's Downtown Protected Cycling Network

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
Moving Forward with Winnipeg's Downtown Protected Cycling Network
by Mruss,K; Suderman,S; Propp,G.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5152 - INTERNET


Winnipeg City Council adopted the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies in 2015 which provides a vision and long-range policy framework for walking and cycling in Winnipeg over the next 20 years. The City immediately began a series of projects to implement the strategies identified in the approved plan, one of these was a downtown corridor study with two sub-projects awarded to MMM in 2015. The sub-projects included: --The functional design of a north-south bicycle facility along the Fort Street and/or Garry Street one- way couplet from the City’s first cycle track on Assiniboine Avenue to north of Portage Avenue, connecting The Forks National Historic Site and mature neighborhoods to the Exchange National Historic District. --The construction of a pedestrian and cyclist controlled connection across Main Street from The Forks to the Assiniboine Avenue cycle track. The goal of the project was to develop a design for upgrading the existing on-street bike lanes on Fort Street and/or Garry Street to protected bike lanes in consultation with stakeholders and the public. Multiple options were developed and evaluated and a recommended option was identified. The City is now moving forward with implementation starting in 2017 for the permanent protected bike lanes in addition to renewing downtown infrastructure. This major project will be a milestone for mobility and infrastructure renewal in Winnipeg’s downtown. The project started with substantial public opposition that was overcome through an adaptive and significant public engagement process. The public engagement process as well as solutions to overcoming the technical challenges will be discussed in this paper.

Mistissini Wooden Bridge

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
Mistissini Wooden Bridge
Stantec.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5151 - INTERNET


The Cree Nation of Mistissini wanted a new bridge to help them cross the Uupaachikus Pass and reach the land west of the village. Two objectives lay behind the construction of such a structure: access to a larger territory in response to the Cree Community’s population growth, and access to a large gravel pit in order to meet the increasing demand for granular materials used in the community’s construction projects. The project also included the creation of an access road to the gravel pit and extension of Main Street to the new bridge. The structure had to satisfy a number of the community’s needs and features, while supporting the passage of heavy vehicles. It needed to offer two traffic lanes, a sidewalk, and a safety fence to prevent falls. It also had to accommodate the passage of seaplanes under the structure, illuminate river piers for boating safety, and facilitate bridge maintenance by local labour. In 2011, with hydraulic, geotechnical, and environmental studies completed, the Cree Community invited engineering firms to propose a design for the new bridge. Familiar with the initial design, which called for a steel and concrete bridge, the Stantec team demonstrated that a wooden bridge could also meet—indeed exceed—the client’s technical, ecological, aesthetic, and budgetary requirements. Thanks to the community’s openness, Stantec’s team designed a new, 160-metre-long glue-laminated (glulam) wood beam semi-continuous arched structure. The structure comprised four continuous wooden spans combining straight girders and arches in wood. The latter were added inside each span in order to minimize the effects of the interior spans and lend an important architectural aspect to the design. Inaugurated in November 2014, this is one of Canada’s longest wooden bridges.

Meeting the Unique Challenges of Pavements Engineering in the Urban Context, City of Calgary

Thu, 11/23/2017 - 21:35
Meeting the Unique Challenges of Pavements Engineering in the Urban Context, City of Calgary
by Johnston,AG; Lakkavalli,V; Sharma,V.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5150 - INTERNET


Pavements engineering for urban applications is unique and differs in many aspects to that of rural or highway applications. This represents a challenge for major municipal agencies in maintaining the desired level of serviceability of pavements in the most cost effective manner. Over the past decade, the City of Calgary has initiated a number of processes and technologies to address the unique demands of urban pavements. Transit bus traffic, not typically encountered in rural applications, represents the most significant loading to which an urban major roadway is subjected in many cases. The loading associated with articulating transit buses can be ten times or more than that of a standard single unit truck. In addition, the stresses of this type of loading can significantly impact surfacing materials and the resulting performance, and the potential move to electric transit bus types will further increase the effects of these vehicle types. Instability rutting of flexible pavements, and in particular intersection rutting is another aspect of pavement performance that is relatively unique to the urban context. This represents not only a pavement distress causing a reduction in service life, but a significant safety concern. The use of reclaimed materials is generally more of a consideration in the urban context, due to the significant ongoing supply of materials such as Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and Reclaimed Asphalt Shingles (RAS). Although, jurisdictions such as the City of Calgary have been leaders in utilizing these types of materials, there needs to be a compromise between increased use of reclaimed materials and pavement performance. Other aspects of urban pavements represent restrictions that must be accommodated in the design and construction processes. Underground utilities and the need to maintain pavement surface elevations result in impacts on potential subsurface activity, while decreasing the number of options available to rehabilitate and maintain roadways. Traffic accommodation and maintaining business access are also challenges that must be considered during the design and construction of urban pavement rehabilitation and reconstruction. The City of Calgary has, over the past number of years, developed processes and considered newer technologies in addressing the unique challenges of urban pavement performance. This paper will discuss many of these initiatives including enhanced specification development, use of newer technologies to minimize intrusive testing and the implementation of alternate materials for roadway construction (such as Stone Matrix Asphalt (SMA) Polymer Modified Asphalt Binders (PMA) and concrete pads at bus stops). The paper will also discuss the City’s experience with the use of RAP and RAS, and some of the limitations that have been experienced.

Mechanistic-empirical flexible pavement design using i3C-me

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 23:34
Mechanistic-empirical flexible pavement design using i3C-me
by Bilodeau,JP; Doré,G; Grellet,D.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5149 - INTERNET


Mechanistic-empirical (ME) flexible pavement design is now the recommended practice in Canada. Yet, the complexity and the costs associated with the integration of the recent American design method may limit the integration of this approach. The NSERC Research Chair i3C undertook the development of a ME flexible pavement design software as part of its activities. The software, named i3C-me, allows performing ME design, for both structural capacity (using a Linear Elastic Analysis of pavement response) and frost protection (combined Saarelainen-Konrad method), of flexible pavement structures. The objective of the paper is to present and describe the software. This design tool is user-friendly and free and uses three levels of precision depending on the available data, budget and the importance of the project. It also uses seven different modules associated with project identification, design objectives, load characteristics, climate, structure and materials, transfer functions and frost penetration calculations. It includes a fully editable database for the vehicle configurations, material properties, transfer function, etc., therefore the users can add their specific parameters for their local materials or calibrated transfer functions. Among other things, the software is well adapted to the urban context as it can easily consider the effect of vehicle speed and vehicle configuration, such as urban bus.

Manitoba Infrastructure Maintenance Career Training Program

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 23:34
Manitoba Infrastructure Maintenance Career Training Program
Manitoba Infrastructure.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5148 - INTERNET


In the past, the approach to training in the maintenance field operations area had been at best sporadic and reactionary. Previously, the major focus of training had been safety related as a result of changes to Legislation, Regulations or as a result of accidents or incidents. While this is critical, it lacked structure, organization and did not address the growing operational or technological changes in field operations. In addition, there was a very limited view of maintenance work as a career which resulted in a lack of focus on employee development. In order to address this gap, Manitoba Infrastructure’s Maintenance Career Training (MCT) Program was developed with the following objectives: 1. Ensure that staff expertise is consistent in meeting service level expectations; 2. Encompass and recognize all training requirements that achieve these expectations; 3. Ensure the right staff are trained at the right time; 4. Promote competencies through accreditation/certification, and; 5. Provide staff with the opportunity to succeed and be promoted to higher Maintenance Worker positions by utilizing promotion through certification and qualification.

Life Cycle Cost Analysis Considerations in Pavement Type Selection in Red Deer and Construction Challenges

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 23:34
Life Cycle Cost Analysis Considerations in Pavement Type Selection in Red Deer and Construction Challenges
by Bouteillier,C; Gustafson,W.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5147 - INTERNET


In 2016 The City of Red Deer issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to complete intersection/roadway improvements and upgrading of the 67 Street and Johnstone Drive intersection and the 66 Street and Orr Drive intersection. The RFP contained alternative bid options for asphalt concrete and Portland cement concrete (PCC). Pavement type selection is one of the most challenging decisions for municipalities. Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) as a part of the alternative bid process allows for a better understanding of the true costs of a roadway as opposed to considering only an initial cost of the pavement. The equivalent pavement structures were compared in terms of their Net Present Value. This LCCA approach provided the initial construction costs for each pavement structure and the costs of future maintenance and rehabilitation. Based on the LCCA, the concrete option was selected; the initial construction costs were comparable for both options but the preservation costs over the life cycle were significantly lower for the PCC. The selection process is described in detail and the challenges of traffic accommodation and construction at the busy intersection are discussed.

Le réaménagement de l'échangeur Henri-Bourassa/Pie-IX à Montréal

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 13:35
Le réaménagement de l'échangeur Henri-Bourassa/Pie-IX à Montréal
Ville de Montréal.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5146 - INTERNET


Par l'adoption de son plan de transport en 2008, Montréal souhaite notamment réduire la dépendance à l’automobile en misant sur un usage accru des transports actif et collectif. Par cette approche de mobilité durable, la Ville fait le pari qu’il est possible de soutenir l’économie et de respecter l’environnement, tout en facilitant les déplacements. Parmi les projets rencontrant ces objectifs, celui du réaménagement de l'échangeur Henri-Bourassa/Pie-IX, dont la mise en oeuvre s’est déroulée de 2012 à 2016, peut être cité en exemple. Ce carrefour, qui assure les échanges entre deux des plus importantes artères de Montréal et qui constitue l’une des seize entrées sur l’île de Montréal, possédait une structure qui avait atteint la fin de sa durée de vie utile et qui devait être démolie. Plutôt qu’une reconstruction à l’identique, la Ville de Montréal en a saisi l’opportunité pour repenser la fonction de cet échangeur et revoir la place accordée aux différents modes de transport, en accord avec les orientations de mobilité durable qu’elle s’était donnée. En effet, l’échangeur, dans sa configuration originelle de type autoroutier, était conçu avant tout pour la circulation motorisée, ne répondant plus aux orientations du Plan de transport et du Plan d’urbanisme de Montréal : la circulation des piétons et des cyclistes y était difficile; les quartiers résidentiels riverains subissaient une circulation de transit importante; le tissu urbanisé était interrompu de par l’envergure de l’échangeur, limitant ainsi les échanges et la possibilité de densifier le secteur. En 2012, la Ville de Montréal a donc entrepris des travaux majeurs, budgétisés à 54M$, visant à transformer intégralement l’échangeur en un carrefour urbain à échelle humaine, où davantage de place serait allouée aux piétons et au transport en commun, où la circulation de transit dans les quartiers résidentielles serait supprimée et où l’accent serait mis sur la qualité des aménagements. Le réaménagement retenu a transformé radicalement l’échangeur puisque les travaux, achevés en 2016, ont consisté à démolir le viaduc Henri-Bourassa, à démanteler les bretelles de circulation adjacentes et à créer trois intersections à niveau. Ces trois intersections sont contrôlées par des feux de circulation et des feux piétons. Les trottoirs ont été élargis substantiellement et les cyclistes bénéficient d’aménagements qui leur sont dédiés. Ce projet a également été pensé en fonction de la venue prochaine du Système rapide par bus (SRB) Pie-IX qui prévoit l’aménagement de voies réservées permanente au centre du carrefour et un accroissement significatif de l’offre de service de transport en commun, réduisant la demande véhiculaire par un transfert modal de la voiture vers les transports collectifs. L’ensemble de ces interventions (réduction de la capacité routière et accroissement de l’offre de transport en commun) se traduira par une diminution substantielle des débits de circulation dans le carrefour Henri-Bourassa / Pie-IX, passant de 118 000 véh/jour à 90 000 véh/jour. Par ce réaménagement, l'ambiance de la rue a été totalement modifiée, que ce soit par des trottoirs généreux et plantés, la création de larges places publiques, le recours à des matériaux de qualité. Enfin, le démantèlement de l’échangeur a permis une récupération importante de terrains, de l’ordre de 150 000 pi2 qui pourront être exploités à des fins de requalification urbaine.

Le Programme d’implantation de rues piétonnes et partagées : une incitation à se déplacer à pied – Direction des Transports, Ville de Montréal

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 13:35
Le Programme d’implantation de rues piétonnes et partagées : une incitation à se déplacer à pied – Direction des Transports, Ville de Montréal
by Armand,MH.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5145 - INTERNET


Le Programme d’implantation de rues piétonnes et partagées (PIRPP) a été lancé en janvier 2015 par la Direction des Transports du Service des infrastructures, de la voirie et des transports de la Ville de Montréal. La Ville de Montréal a choisi de se positionner en soutenant la marche, un mode de transport durable qui présente de grands avantages pour l’individu comme pour l’environnement urbain. Le Programme d’implantation de rues piétonnes et partagées vise à soutenir techniquement et financièrement les 19 arrondissements dans la réalisation de projets de piétonnisation.

Investing in Road Construction: Using a Design-Build Approach to Build Canada's Economy in Saskatchewan

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 13:35
Investing in Road Construction: Using a Design-Build Approach to Build Canada's Economy in Saskatchewan
by Melton,SJ; Meinert,G.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5144 - INTERNET


Despite the current economic downturn throughout Western Canada, the Province of Saskatchewan has been growing at an unprecedented rate, and the bedroom-community cities of Warman and Martensville, north of Saskatoon have mirrored that growth. As a result, Highway 11 and 12 corridors travelling adjacent to these cities have been the subject of several planning studies over the last 5-10 years. These studies have indicated a need for interchanges at both Warman on Highway 11 at Highway 305 and Martensville at Main Street/Township Road 384. Therefore, the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure (MHI) in Saskatchewan has decided to proceed with plans to construct interchanges at both locations. The interchanges will address safety and economic development requirements for the Highway 11 and Highway 12 corridors north of Saskatoon. This project represents the first phase in addressing the larger transportation infrastructure needs in the Saskatoon region. Funding from the Federal Government, along with a provincial contribution, enabled the project to become a reality as a design-build project. MHI and ISL Engineering and Land Services Ltd. (ISL), as the Owner’s Engineer, have joined forces to prepare design-build documents for these interchanges with construction starting in 2017 and completion by 2019. Although, the steps taken to undertake a design-build project are well documented by several jurisdictions, numerous different examples exist for the preparation of design-build documentation. Saskatchewan has undertaken this task by combining parts of the Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta models, which have resulted in a robust model that has used a Fairness Monitor to ensure transparency throughout the Qualification and Proposal Request processes, and an Independent Certifier, which combines the normal duties of this independent body with a Road Safety Auditor. A “bucket” system has been developed for contract deficiencies, whereby negative points are accumulated by the Design-Builder resulting in financial penalties when the bucket is full. This paper examines the amount of work involved in incorporating these unique requirements into clauses in the design-build agreement.

Investing in Highway Commercial Development: An Introduction to Alberta's Commercial Safety Rest Area Project

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 13:35
Investing in Highway Commercial Development: An Introduction to Alberta's Commercial Safety Rest Area Project
by Steel,PHA; Kua,C; Miller,J; Lo,C.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5143 - INTERNET


Alberta Transportation and the Owner’s Engineering Consultant Team recently began the Alternate Delivery of Highway (Commercial) Safety Rest Areas (SRA) project. The intent of this project is to develop commercial SRA (CSRA) at no (or minimal) cost to government by having sites operated through an agreement with private developer(s) for a specified time period. Fourteen initial sites on government owned land have been shortlisted with the study team working to determine the feasibility of developing these sites, which are located on National Highway System corridors including Highway 1 (Trans-Canada), Highway 2 (Queen Elizabeth II), Highway 16 (Yellowhead) and Highway 63 (Fort McMurray/Athabasca Oil Sands access). The project requires the team to establish standards for provision of commercial services, conduct a jurisdictional scan of other agencies, develop functional plans and a business case for those sites pursued under this project, and administer the project through to construction. The project is currently in the functional planning phase of the work, which focuses on understanding the physical and economic strength of each site to support commercial development interests. The viability of the project is largely contingent on having sufficient traffic volumes that will bring in adequate revenue streams for potential development partners throughout the concession period. As such, it is important to establish policies and standards that will provide safe, convenient, comfortable and efficient rest areas to entice road users to utilize these facilities. Site enhancement opportunities (i.e., use of branding techniques to highlight surrounding regional and/or topographic features; provision of additional recreational features; amalgamation with tourism) will be sought for each site to customize these to local, regional and national travel demand needs. Sustainability measures are also being considered that meet green initiatives and support future travel requirements such as electric car charging and truck electrification. This presentation will address many of the initial considerations made during this first work phase regarding the economic/market factors that influence the viability of introducing commercial development to highway rest areas, site design and layout factors (building and site size, commercial amenities, user amenities, parking allowances, and fueling opportunities), and transportation design factors (roadside or median placement, traffic circulation, parking layout and access management). It will also address other items of interest to practitioners including sustainability, branding, legislation, emerging design and policy issues, and investment demands.

Investigating the Effect of Warm Mix Additive on the Performance of Asphalt Mixtures

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 13:35
Investigating the Effect of Warm Mix Additive on the Performance of Asphalt Mixtures
by Sanchez,X; Varamini,S; Somers,T; Sweezie,M; Tighe,SL.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5142 - INTERNET


Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is a technology that has seen widespread growth in Canada since its introduction to North America in 2002. Since this technology is relatively new, there are still concerns about how these asphalt mixtures will perform over long-term, especially regarding resistance to moisture damage. Moisture damage is the primary driver for the deterioration of asphalt in the field, and can also exacerbate existing life-cycle stresses and cause premature failure. The wide range of different techniques being used for this technology makes it difficult to make broad generalizations, as some seem to perform much better than others in a laboratory setting. With this in mind, a study comparing the results from plant produced WMA against a known hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) will provide useful information on what can be expected from the mixes currently in use. This study compared a WMA mix using a 0.3% Evotherm M1 additive and an HMA mix produced by a local provider in New Brunswick. These asphalt mixtures were prepared using the same locally sourced binder and aggregate. The WMA mix performed well compared to the control HMA mix in a Modified Lottman Test; both had tensile strength ratio (TSR) values above the minimum of 75%, and it was found that there is no difference between the WMA and HMA Tensile Strengths. Additional testing on the performance of the mixtures using the Hamburg Wheel rutting test was performed, and the mechanical response of the mixtures was characterized using the Dynamic Modulus Test. Additionally, the impact on the life cycle and a comparison using the Mechanistic-Empirical Design Method were analyzed and no difference was found in long-term performance of WMA and HMA.

Interesting Solutions for a Culvert Rehabilitation Project in a Sensitive Urban Watershed

Thu, 11/16/2017 - 22:34
Interesting Solutions for a Culvert Rehabilitation Project in a Sensitive Urban Watershed
by Stahl,J; Sinke,D.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5141 - INTERNET


Bovaird Drive is a key east-west arterial in the Region of Peel, with traffic volumes of approximately 5500 AADT. Just west of Heritage Road, a tributary to the Credit River crosses Bovaird Drive through a 14m deep culvert with three distinct segments, including a 20m long 75 year +/- old masonry structure, and two newer sections – a 20m long cast-in-place concrete box culvert, and a larger 60m long cast-in-place concrete box culvert. Both the first and second segments were structurally deficient and required removal and replacement. A 2m vertical internal drop between the first and second culvert sections impeded fish passage. Extensive consultation was undertaken with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), and Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) to develop a design that would meet the requirements for hydraulic passage and environmental permitting. The approved designed, tendered and constructed culvert involved 20,000 m3 of earth excavation to expose the deficient portion of the culvert, removal of 40m of the existing deficient culvert and replacement with a 20m long x 1.2m wide by 2.8m high precast concrete box structure, installation of wooden fish baffles within the culvert to improve passage for large-bodied fish, reconstruction of the upstream portion of the tributary for approximately 65m using a pool-step configuration, temporary realignment of Bovaird Drive (reduced to one lane in each direction and with lanes shifted to the south), roadside protection, construction of temporary access roads into the valley to facilitate construction equipment movement, and reforestation of the disturbed area with 400+ trees and 450+ shrubs. The culvert was over 14m deep which required movement of a large volume of earth by heavy excavation equipment. Careful consideration was required for protection of the natural environment. As required by agencies, the final construction must improve the ability for fish to travel upstream. The new 20m long precast culvert created a 4m difference between the existing tributary and the new culvert invert. Fish passage was achieved through an innovative approach which utilized a fish baffle system within the existing culvert, followed by a pool-step channel, connecting the existing channel to the new culvert in the shortest distance possible, while allowing the fish to jump from pool to pool. Finally, and most importantly, the structurally deficient sections of the existing culvert were removed and replaced. This not only ensures continued operation of a key arterial roadway, but also has improved the ability of the Credit River Tributary to function as a healthy and vibrant natural system.

Integrating Laser Crack Measuring System into the Saskatchewan Pavement Management System

Wed, 11/15/2017 - 22:34
Integrating Laser Crack Measuring System into the Saskatchewan Pavement Management System
by Williams,B; Andre,N; Bowey,K; Huynh,K.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5140 - INTERNET


Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure (SMHI) has replaced the visual assessment method for collecting pavement condition information with data measured using the Laser Crack Measuring System (LCMS). Pavement bleeding, stone pick outs, ravelling, wheel path rutting, bumps & dips and all types of pavement cracking have been incorporated into the Saskatchewan pavement asset management system. The paper discusses how the field calibration site and testing fit into the overall project. The site was set up to understand repeatability of the categorization and severity of each measured distress. The design, construction and results from the field calibration site are discussed. Analysis of multiple measurements taken at the site was used to modify and fine tune the metrics developed for the Pavement Asset Management System. The paper includes: An over view of the LCMS integration project; Design, set up and operation of a field calibration site for surface distress measured by the LCMS including cracking, bleeding, potholes, delamination, pick outs and ravelling; Findings from the analysis of the calibration testing; Improvements that will be incorporated into the next cycle of data collection.

Innovative Geotechnical Investigation and Construction Procedures for the Foundations of the New Champlain Bridge, Montreal

Wed, 11/15/2017 - 22:34
Innovative Geotechnical Investigation and Construction Procedures for the Foundations of the New Champlain Bridge, Montreal
by D'Amours,L; Grenier,S.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5139 - INTERNET


The replacement of the actual Champlain Bridge crossing the Saint-Lawrence River at the height of Montréal and Brossard in the province of Quebec, Canada was tendered as a PPP project. The design of the new bridge required extensive geotechnical investigations in order to use construction techniques adapted to the timeline specified in the contract. Firstly, innovating investigation techniques that were used to determine the sound rock level for the installation of the pier foundation footings for the main bridge will be presented. Secondly, large scale in situ tests, using an Osterberg cell which were carried out to optimize the caissons design of the main tower will be described. Finally, the results of these investigations will be presented and the construction techniques put in place in order to allow quality control during construction of the foundations.

Initiatives by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario to Reduce the Delay Cost Associated with Major Highway Incidents

Wed, 11/15/2017 - 22:34
Initiatives by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario to Reduce the Delay Cost Associated with Major Highway Incidents
by Pringle,R; Nikolic,G.
2017.
TAC 2017: Investing in Transportation: Building Canada's Economy - - 2017 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada.
CA6 ARH_10 2017A5138 - INTERNET


A major incident on a 400-series highway in the Greater Toronto Area has the potential to result in significant costs related to delay with respect to both passenger and commercial travel. Such incidents might involve collisions requiring police investigation or truck roll-overs, fires, or major spills, and could result in partial or full highway closures over multiple hours. In addition, significant delay would be anticipated on “diversion” routes used by drivers to circumvent the incident, as well as delay incurred during the system recovery period once the highway has been re-opened. Since traffic flows on major highways can range from 5,000 vehicles/hour to between 10,000 and 15,000 vehicles per hour over much of the typical day, the total delay cost from a single incident can run into the millions of dollars without even considering the implications for the broader economy. The Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) is in the process of reviewing response strategies to major incidents in two contexts. First, prior to the 2015 Pan Am/ParaPan Am Games, the Ministry developed traffic management plans to address major incidents affecting the highways accommodating the temporary High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes implemented for the Games. These plans were designed to be more proactive than ambient incident response protocols. The use of the plans on several occasions during the Games created a generally favourable impression of the potential to reduce the impacts of traffic incidents. Secondly, the potential benefit associated with reducing the amount of time required to clear truck roll-overs and similar incidents has been investigated. We also note that ongoing expansion of the use of advanced traffic management systems (ATMS) by the Ministry enhances the toolbox available for incident-related traffic management. This paper describes the process used to develop more pro-active traffic management protocols for major incidents and provides an evaluation of some of the potential benefits of reducing the time required to clear truck roll-over incidents.

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